color

new ok go music video for the one moment
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OK Go are back with another video today, and it’s, once again, a colorful, mind-blowing mess. Directed by OK Go-singer Damian Kulash, Jr. "The One Moment" is a "a moment of total chaos and confusion, and then unraveled that moment, discovering the beauty, wonder, and structure within.” Is there a better way to describe this thing?

As you may or may not have already seen, the video itself only took 4.2 seconds to shoot, but when slowed down, the video reveals a series of intricate choreography that combines water, explosions, and lots and lots of paint. The stats on the video are really impressive.

Kulash recounts:

“There are 318 events (54 colored salt bursts behind Tim, 23 exploding paint buckets, 128 gold water balloons, etc.) that were synchronized to the music before the breakdown. After that there are only 9 digitally triggered events.”

For more on the video and what went into it, check out the background notes here. In the mean time, you can just watch the video again.

via GIPHY

image color ugly This Is the Ugliest Color Known to Man
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Some call it Pantone 448 C, others call it "opaque couché". There are even some people who refer to it as "death" to describe it because it's just that awful. Experts chose this disgusting green-brown color through several studies to put on the packs of Australian cigarette packs. Hopefully the drab dark color will discourage people from smoking. 

Mind F*ck of The Day: This Test Will Make Your Brain See Color in a Fully Black-and-White Photograph
Via: BBC Four
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Our brains are weird.

In a new BBC Four series, Colour: The Spectrum of Science, researchers show how the human brain is controlled by perception.

By watching the video below and staring at the blue dot in the center of the screen, a full black-and-white photograph will turn into full color.

It's science, man!

IFL Science explains:

It's all to do with our cone cells, one of the two types of photoreceptors within our eye's retina, which are responsible for color vision. We have three types of cones, which are sensitive to blue, green or red wavelengths of light. When we're exposed to a lot of one color, that particular type of cone gets overstimulated and becomes "tired" and unresponsive. This leaves you temporarily with the use of only your other two types of cone, which show the opposing "complementary" color (i.e red versus green and blue versus yellow). After a few seconds, the cones "recharge" and you're able to perceive that color again.

So...blue and black OR white and gold?

Via: ed.ted.com
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TED educator Colm Kelleher explains the physics behind how colors appear the way they do. For more resources on electromagnetic waves, TED Ed has got you covered.

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