national geographic

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

If there’s one thing we know about reviving dinosaurs for a theme park, it’s that it all starts with something encased in amber.

Dr. John Hammond in the film Jurassic Park resurrects the dinosaurs with a sample of blood from a mosquito. Who knows what he could do with this: A 99-year-old feathered dinosaur tail, which was recently discovered in a Myanmar market.

via National Geographic

The amber is “roughly the size of an apricot” and “captures one of the Earliest moments of differentiation between the feathers of birds of flight and the feathers of dinosaurs.” Though, because of these feathers, the dinosaur was probably unable to fly. This means scientists could actually see the color of the tail, which was “described as chestnut brown with a pale or white underside.”

Of course, up until now, we had thought that discovering something in amber was the first step toward opening a theme park of dinosaurs and getting your grandchildren attacked by a velociraptor or something. But we do we know, we just saw Jurassic Park. It’s not like that makes you an expert in dino attacks and how to prevent them.

via National Geographic

Like many of these types of amber, this one was actually meant to be sold as jewelry. This was just one of two dozen purchased from a Myanmar market. Lisa Xing of the China University of Geoscience, who led the research, told National Geographic that because conflicts between the Myanmar government and the Kachin Independence Army are “nearing end,” the Hukawng Valley, where these ambers are found, will open up and more discoveries can be made.

"Maybe we can find a complete dinosaur.” he said.

And all we can do is watch in horror as this paleontologist casually begins a Jurassic Park scenario that we’re all destined to become wrapped up in.

via Jurassic Park Films

Rats can climb into your toilet and we know how.
  • -
  • Vote
  • -



Welp, just plan on holding it for the rest of your life.



National Geographic decided to make everyone feel even less safe by writing up a long piece, complete with video, on how exactly rats can scale up your pipes and pop into your toilet. Sadists over there, every one of them.

Rats' superpowers are near-mythical: They can swim for three days. They can fit through holes the size of a quarter. They've even been said to have no solid bones, just cartilage (definitely false, and I can't confirm whether they can collapse their ribcages). I looked to science for the truth. But I was surprised by the dearth of studies on the Norway rat—the common city rat, Rattus norvegicus—in the wild (the wild in this case being any city on Earth). Despite our long human history with lab rats, we know very little about the lives of the rats in our homes.

..."If it doesn't have food and water, it goes into this kind of 'crazy mode,'" ['Rat King' Robert] Corrigan said. Rats have a very low tolerance for hunger—so to get rid of them simply ask where they're getting food and eliminate the source.

Corrigan said... it does make it easier for rats to get into toilets. As if to make the point, the day after we capped our toilet pipe, a rat popped up in my next-door neighbor's toilet.

Plus, toilet drainage turns out to be a boon for sewer rats. "Lots of food gets flushed," Corrigan pointed out.



Yep, you can't think of the toilet as a safe throne. Think of it more of a rat dimensional portal.



They even put together a frighteningly descriptive video on just exactly a rat can make its little way up to the commode and into your nightmares.



Here's a TL;DW gif:



We apologize for stripping you of further illusions of comfort. Blame the rats.

national geographic,discovery,fossils,dinosaurs
  • -
  • Vote
  • -
Discovery of the feathered dinosaur, dubbed Changyuraptor yangi ("great feather" in Chinese), adds to the roster of feathered raptor dinosaurs with hind wings found in northeastern China in the past two decades. It is the biggest one found so far, and the fifth such species.
national geographic,sand,Fulgurite
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Fulgurites are natural hollow glass tubes formed in quartzose sand, silica, or soil by lightning strikes (at 3,270 °F), which instantaneously melts silica on a conductive surface and fuses grains together over a period of around one second. Photographed by Ken Smith.

aurora borealis,contest,national geographic,northern lights,photo gallery
By Unknown
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Turns out National Geographic photographers aren't the only ones who can capture all those amazing and iconic shots. A recent photo contest turned up a treasure trove of images from around the world. View the full gallery -- starting with the winning entry -- here.

[cosbysweaters]

By Unknown
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

There isn't really anything we can say that will top this YouTube comment:

Nobody show him the Hindenburg video.

(Not Safe For Work -- adult content.)

[hypervocal]

By Unknown
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Story Time of the Day: "Take a picture and save our species, we have 300 left": NatGeo photographer Mattias Klum recalls the time he came face-to-face with an endangered Asiatic lioness in India's Gir Forest.

[ichc.]

Back to Top