science

space science image The Hubble Took an Image of a 'Blue Bubble' That Is Actually a Nebula
Via: @NASA
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The Hubble Space Telescope took this image of a star that looks like it's inside a blue bubble. NASA says the blue bubble is actually a nebula formed around 20,000 years ago. This is how it's described on the Hubble's website:

The distinctive blue bubble appearing to encircle WR 31a is a Wolf–Rayet nebula — an interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other gases. Created when speedy stellar winds interact with the outer layers of hydrogen ejected by Wolf–Rayet stars, these nebulae are frequently ring-shaped or spherical.


According to NASA, these type of stars don't last very long (in terms of bodies in space at least). It'll only be around for a "few hundred thousand years".


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Get your conspiracy theories ready. This spooky TV documentary about the lost files from the Apollo 10 space mission suggests that there might be something out there on the dark side of the Moon. 



While orbiting the Moon in 1969, these 'previously lost' recordings show that the astronauts on Apollo 10 heard some kind of strange music.  Of course, the prevailing (reasonable) theory suggests radio interference.  In 1969, it might have seemed strange and unexplained but after decades of space exploration, NASA has actually recorded similar sounds in different parts of the Solar System. 




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When the soft drink 7-Up first came out it was 'lithiated'. The soda used to include lithium citrate, which is now better known as a mood-stabilizing drug. Similar to how Coca-Cola famously used to contain cocaine, the makers of 7-Up were capitalizing on the popularity of "medicated" soft drinks at the time.

That's what inspired this experiment. The original 7-Up did not contain a chunk of metal lithium but the end result is entertaining. The solution even ends up working as an indicator, changing from colorful to clear and back again depending on the acidity of the solution.

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Japanese artist Nobumichi Asai created this effect by projecting images onto faces in real time. The features of the user's faces are mapped and tracked and then the 'new face' is projected onto that in a 3D pattern that gives them such a realistic look. 

This kind of 3D projection has also been used to make videos like this one: 

Amazing how much lightning can strike our planet in a short timeFlying from North Africa over Turkey towards Russia in this timelapse (this is speeded up; travelling about 5500 km would take around 10-12 minutes, covered here in 30 seconds).

Posted by Tim Peake on Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Astronaut Tim Peake posted a time lapse video from the International Space Station (ISS) that caught a particularly striking view of lightening as it flew over Earth. According to the caption, all these lightening strikes happened in a matter of minutes:

Flying from North Africa over Turkey towards Russia in this timelapse (this is speeded up; travelling about 5500 km would take around 10-12 minutes, covered here in 30 seconds).


As the ISS orbits the Earth astronauts living in the space station have the chance to take amazing time lapse video like this and others.

meteor death science Against All Odds, One Very Unlucky Man Became the First Person to Die by Meteorite Against All Odds, One Very Unlucky Man Became the First Person to Die by Meteorite
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Death by meteorite is a very, very uncommon way to go. Most objects from space disintegrate while entering the Earth's atmosphere. A man in Tamil Nadu, India may be the first person to actually be killed by a falling meteorite in at least 200 years, according to NDTV. Scientists are still analyzing the scrap of material that is believed to be the meteorite for confirmation.  The explosion from the impact also shattered windows in a nearby school building but everyone inside remained unhurt. 



A similar thing happened in Russia in 2013 and it was caught on film. You can see the meteor streaking through the sky on its way to strike a building. 

daddy longlegs penis fossils This Daddy Longlegs Trapped in Amber is Having a 'Hard' Time
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Have you ever wanted to see a 99 million-year-old spider penis? I bet you thought that wasn't even an option but here it is, preserved in amber:


Most spiders use a modified leg to procreate but the harvestman, also known as a Daddy Longlegs, has a special attachment for that sort of thing that is normally hidden inside the body of the spider. This ancient Daddy Longlegs is unique, he is the first to be found in such a 'passionate' stance and the shape and size of his baby maker has prompted researchers to declare a new family of arachnids based on this finding. 
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