Protest

Protesters block the route of a Portland tanker by hanging from a bridge in hammocks.
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Every activist probably wishes they could accomplish as much sitting in a hammock.

The Washington Post reports that 13 protestors took to the sky (sorta) July 29 as they lowered themselves down from a bridge to try and stop Shell moving on to drill for oil in the arctic.

The protesters took to the St. Johns Bridge over the Willamette River early Wednesday to block the icebreaker, named the Fennica, from heading north to protect Shell's fleet from ice and respond to an oil spill, should one occur.

"They are creating a human barricade so that the Shell icebreaker cannot get through," Annie Leonard, the executive director of Greenpeace USA, told KATU in Portland. "They are prepared to stay up there for days because that's what it is going to take to save the Arctic."





The Portland Mercury said the tactic apparently worked because the tanker, named the Fennica, had to retreat.

The activism springs from both growing concerns over an oil spill and a local feeling of duty.

As the Mercury says:

The U.S. Department of Interior says there is a 75 percent chance of an oil spill in the Arctic once drilling commences, a spill which experts say would be virtually impossible to clean up, posing unacceptable risks to indigenous peoples and the marine environment. Shell is proposing to commence drilling in this untouched region—thanks to rapidly melting ice in the Arctic due to climate change— at a time when NASA's former top climate scientist says we may see at least 10 feet of sea level rise by 2050.

"In Portland and across the Northwest, we have the unique opportunity and responsibility to act as a chokepoint in the transport of dirty coal, oil, and gas. For years, Portland has demonstrated powerful resistance to the shipping of coal and oil by rail, as well as tar sands mining equipment by road," says Meredith Cocks of Portland Rising Tide. "We view the arrival of Shell's icebreaker in Portland as another chance to disrupt new oil development and demonstrate that any and all new fossil fuel exploration and extraction is an unacceptable risk to our climate and future."



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There were 3.7 million people at this weekend's anti-terrorism rally in Paris – the largest in French history.

One of those people was Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama, who wore this simple, yet powerful symbol of solidarity in his jacket pocket.

Rama used to teach at the Academy of Arts of Albania and was an artist himself for years. As mayor of Tirana, he organized a mural project to transform Soviet-era ruins into colorful works of art.

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A local Fox news affiliate in Baltimore has apologized for erroneously using a video clip of a protest to illustrate anti-police sentiment calling it an "honest misunderstanding."

In the video above, from a WBFF Fox45 news segment, a woman is heard chanting "kill a cop," which would indeed be startling if it were true, especially in light of the recent shootings in New York. But it's not.

Unfortunately for everyone involved, this is taken completely out of context, as many pointed out.

The original clip is from a "Justice For All" March in Washington, D.C., and the woman featured in the video, Tawanda Jones, is not asking for anyone to be killed.

"We won't stop! We can't stop! Till killer cops are in cell blocks!" she says as you can hear below (at 0:42).



Jones' brother Tyrone West died in 2013 while in police custody.

WBFF interviewed Jones following the screw up, and she said she is baffled as to why they edited the clip the way they did.

"You'd have to be an idiot – someone that hates – to say 'kill somebody,' especially some cops that I need to protect my family," she said. "Nobody deserves to be brutally murdered."

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A few players on the St. Louis Rams decided to hold a little protest of their own on Sunday, prior to their game against the Oakland Raiders, by entering the field with their arms up to show support for the protesters in Ferguson.

Tavon Austin, Kenny Britt, Stedman Bailey, Jared Cook and Chris Givens all participated in the stunt before pregame introductions, with the coach denying any advance knowledge of it.

The St. Louis Police Officers Association is not amused. They are asking the NFL to issue an apology calling it "tasteless, offensive and inflammatory."

But the Rams are standing by their actions.

"I just think there has be to a change," said Cook. "There has to be change that starts with the people that are most influential around the world."

Via: BBC News
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While the world was gawking at Kim Kardashian's oily butt, Australians were sticking their own butts up in the air on Bondi Beach to speak out against the government's lack of action on climate change.

In 2009. Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott called climate change "crap," but changed his stance this year to say he would take it "very seriously."

But because Abbott decided against adding climate change to agenda of the G20 summit, which kicks off this weekend, more than 400 protesters gathered to shove their heads in the sand to make a statement.

Via: BBC
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Maximo Caminero, a Miami-based artist, was named in a police affidavit as the defendant. He told an officer that his act was a protest against the gallery's decision to only display international art.

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