iPhone 6s internals may lead to a wide difference in battery life.
Via: 9to5mac
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Just like last year's bendable iPhone 6 and Antennagate before that, along with a new iPhone release comes a technology scandal.

Which are either the least sexy or the sexiest scandals imaginable, depending on your tastes.

Tech bloggers and testers are discovering that iPhone 6s have one of two possible different A9 chips and, if their tests are to be believe, a significant contrast in battery life exists between the two.

9to5 Mac breaks it down:

Some models ship with a processor made by TSMC while others come with a Samsung-made component. While you'd expect that Apple would ensure both are built to offer comparable performance, it appears that may not be the case. It's already been revealed by Chipworks that the Sammy model is 10% smaller, but if a couple of videos recently published are anything to go by, you might be better off with a TSMC model…

Well-known tech YouTubers, Austin Evans and Jonathan Morrison both uploaded videos showing how they tested the TSMC and Samsung models against each other and ended up with the same conclusion: You'll get better battery life from the TSMC model.

Here's the original video which discovered the difference between the battery life.

9to5 Mac did their own tests to double check, corroborating the original video.

The story gets ickier.

Both videos suggest that iPhone 6s users download a free app called Lirum Device Info Lite to check which chip users have in their phone.

Well, as of this Oct. 8 morning writing, Apple appears to have removed it from their App Store.

What do you think? Are you worried about your new phone and its battery life?

Samsung's smart tv's will listen in on your personal conversations.
Via: Mashable
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The Cincinnati Zoo will say goodbye to one of its members soon, as Harapan the Sumatran rhino will return to Indonesia in hopes of saving the quickly vanishing population.

With less than 100 of his kind still in existence in the world, Harapan will leave to join a breeding program.

As Mashable states:

His species, also known as the "hairy rhino," is a descendant of Ice Age woolly ancestors. The zoo said their numbers have fallen by 90% since the '80s, in part due to deforestation in Southeast Asia and poaching for their horns.

A report published this month said that after years of searching for the Sumatran rhino in the forests of Malaysia, officials have declared that the animal has gone extinct in the Southeast Asian country.

Now, 8-year-old Harapan will go to his ancestral home to join 14-year-old Andalas, who has so far managed to sire one male offspring since arriving in Indonesia in 2007.

Here's some footage of Harapan frolicking around:

And here's some pictures of baby Sumatran rhinos being extremely precious:

Harapan, or 'Harry' as he's known to zoo keepers, is the last remaining Sumatran rhino in America.

We wish him luck.

Samsung fridges are easily hacked for your email passwords.
Via: Daily Dot
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You know how everything connects to the Internet these days? Well, it looks like the refrigerators from Samsung aren't very smart about it.

A group of hackers discovered that they can easily scrape the fridge's information for Gmail passwords, thus giving you yet another reason to not trust your refrigerator, or techonology, or anything really.

As Daily Dot reports:

Security researchers at the firm Pen Test Partners found a flaw in Samsung's smart fridges that lets anyone with the right technical know-how intercept the Gmail username and password of the fridge's owner.

Ken Munro, one of the researchers, told the Register that the hack—known as a "man-in-the-middle" attack because of the way it intercepts the data—takes advantage of the fridge's Google Calendar feature.

"It appears to work the same way that any device running a Gmail calendar does," Munro said. "A logged-in user/owner of the calendar makes updates and those changes are then seen on any device that a user can view the calendar on."

As with all these new fangled things onto which we are just throwing all our über-personal information, we should really take care.

Don't tell your fridge your secrets or who knows what could happen.

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