activism

Steve O climbs a crane with an inflatable whale to protest SeaSorld.
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Steve-O, from Jackass and stuntman fame, introduced Facebook to 'Sammy' Aug. 8 and hinted he would do something stupid with the inflatable whale.

This is Shammy. We're going to do a big dangerous stunt in Los Angeles tomorrow that will probably get me in a lot of...

Posted by Steve-O on Saturday, August 8, 2015


His master plan, it turns out, was to climb a construction crane in Los Angeles and, with the help of Sammy, protest SeaWorld.

The Los Angeles Times reported on his stunt:

More than 80 firefighters were called to the 6000 block of West Selma Avenue about 8 p.m. on reports of a possible suicide attempt after an unidentified person was spotted on the crane, Los Angeles Fire Department spokeswoman Margaret Stewart said.

LAPD Lt. Michael Ling confirmed that Steve-O, whose real name is Stephen Glover, was arrested and is expected to be booked on suspicion of trespassing, setting a firework without a permit, and conspiracy to commit a crime. Investigators are still determining what charges apply, Ling said.

The apparent stunt prompted annoyance and frustration among public safety officials. More than 30 LAPD officers were called to the scene, and Selma Avenue was shut down.

Glover, 41, brought an inflatable Orca with him to the top of the crane and wore a "Blackfish" T-shirt, making the stunt another of his public demonstrations against SeaWorld.

Last year, he was charged with a traffic infraction for an anti-SeaWorld stunt in which he defaced a freeway sign in San Diego. He posted a YouTube video in August 2014 showing him climbing up the freeway sign to attach the word "sucks'' after the words "Sea World."



Steve-O, the true showman that he is, video recorded a great deal of it for you on his Facebook page.

Be warned, there is explicit language. Like you would expect.

Anyone wanna bail me out of jail?

Posted by Steve-O on Sunday, August 9, 2015

Protesters block the route of a Portland tanker by hanging from a bridge in hammocks.
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Every activist probably wishes they could accomplish as much sitting in a hammock.

The Washington Post reports that 13 protestors took to the sky (sorta) July 29 as they lowered themselves down from a bridge to try and stop Shell moving on to drill for oil in the arctic.

The protesters took to the St. Johns Bridge over the Willamette River early Wednesday to block the icebreaker, named the Fennica, from heading north to protect Shell's fleet from ice and respond to an oil spill, should one occur.

"They are creating a human barricade so that the Shell icebreaker cannot get through," Annie Leonard, the executive director of Greenpeace USA, told KATU in Portland. "They are prepared to stay up there for days because that's what it is going to take to save the Arctic."





The Portland Mercury said the tactic apparently worked because the tanker, named the Fennica, had to retreat.

The activism springs from both growing concerns over an oil spill and a local feeling of duty.

As the Mercury says:

The U.S. Department of Interior says there is a 75 percent chance of an oil spill in the Arctic once drilling commences, a spill which experts say would be virtually impossible to clean up, posing unacceptable risks to indigenous peoples and the marine environment. Shell is proposing to commence drilling in this untouched region—thanks to rapidly melting ice in the Arctic due to climate change— at a time when NASA's former top climate scientist says we may see at least 10 feet of sea level rise by 2050.

"In Portland and across the Northwest, we have the unique opportunity and responsibility to act as a chokepoint in the transport of dirty coal, oil, and gas. For years, Portland has demonstrated powerful resistance to the shipping of coal and oil by rail, as well as tar sands mining equipment by road," says Meredith Cocks of Portland Rising Tide. "We view the arrival of Shell's icebreaker in Portland as another chance to disrupt new oil development and demonstrate that any and all new fossil fuel exploration and extraction is an unacceptable risk to our climate and future."



activism,art,rotting
By Unknown
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This still life of rotting strawberries is part of a disgusting thought-provoking new series by Klaus Pichler called One Third, created as a commentary on global food waste. According to the UN, one-third of global food production isn't eaten, and the largest portion of the waste occurs in northern industrialized nations.

[laughingsquid]

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