cancer

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Get ready for a kick right in the feels.

Jeremiah Succar, a 7-year-old patient at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has stage-four atypical rhabdoid teratoid, an aggressive tumor that occurs in the brain and spinal cord.

He loves Rachel Platten's 'Fight Song,' and sings it when he goes through treatments. When his parents found out about this, they knew they had to get the singer to come visit him.

"Jeremiah loves "Fight Song"โ€”he memorized the lyrics after three or four times of listening to it," says Jerry Succar, Jeremiah's father. "He used to sing it when he got a lot of headaches, but now he sings it in the morning, before bed and during shots he has to get."

His parents sprung into action on Instagram using the hashtag #RachelMeetJeremiah.

Rachel got word of the movement, paid Jeremiah a visit and recorded these beautiful videos. Way to go, Rachel!

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Mike Wilson, a professional parkour and freerunning athlete, wanted to do something special for his 5-year old son Jayden, who was diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor.

So on his birthday this year, he made a replica Spider-Man suit and jumped down from the roof to pay him a visit, capturing the moment with a hidden GoPro camera.

You can read more updates about Jayden on his Facebook page.

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The NFL finally showed a bright side when the Cincinnati Bengals signed Devon Still to the practice squad allowing him to retain his NFL medical insurance. This morning Still posted this endearing video to instagram.

farts,cancer,science,weird,g rated
Via: Time
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Scientists out of the University of Exeter are implying that smelling farts could actually prevent cancer, among other diseases.

"Although hydrogen sulfide gas"โ€”produced when bacteria breaks down foodโ€”"is well known as a pungent, foul-smelling gas in rotten eggs and flatulence, it is naturally produced in the body and could in fact be a healthcare hero with significant implications for future therapies for a variety of diseases," Dr. Mark Wood said in a university release.

Although the stinky gas can be noxious in large doses, scientists believe that a whiff here and there has the power to reduce risks of cancer, strokes, heart attacks, arthritis, and dementia by preserving mitochondria.
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