Nickelodeon explains the splat block of programming.
Via: AV Club
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After teasing this odd video last week, Nickelodeon finally gave up the goods on what exactly they will offer with The Splat.

The AV Club lays out some details:

Arriving Monday, Oct. 5 on TeenNick and all around the internet, The Splat is being billed as a "multiscreen content destination… aggregating the most beloved Nick content from the 1990s and beyond." And while that summary is egregiously grating, what it essentially means is that shows like All That, Are You Afraid Of The Dark?, Clarissa Explains It All, and Legends Of The Hidden Temple are coming back to TV (again) in the near future.

The Splat will take over TeenNick nightly from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., but will also live online at and via an Emoji keyboard, so CatDog loving 30-somethings can Snapchat each other silly cartoons, or whatever. Viewers can also weigh in on what programming they want to see on the channel, something that TeenNick SVP Keith Dawkins told The A.V. Club is really going to help build the channel. As he put it in an interview, "the multiple screen experience allows us to listen to the audience in ways we never could years ago," noting that while shows like The Adventures Of Pete And Pete might not be on the initial list of shows on the network, that doesn't mean they won't show up down the road—provided there's demand. "It'll all be based on what the audience tells us they want," says Dawkins.

The preliminary website is still only in its rudimentary stage, but surely it will have a list of what shows will be playing and at what times.

Nickelodeon is toying with launching a 1990s cartoon network called The Splat.
Via: Buzzfeed
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Alright 1990s kids, calm down and breathe deep. Nothing official has happened yet.

Still, there are credible rumblings that Nickelodeon might be launching a channel exclusively dedicated to cartoons from your favorite decade. You know, like Rugrats, Ren and Stimpy and The Wild Thornberrys.

Try not to hyperventilate. Again, nothing official has happened.

But let us tell you what we know.

A couple of days again, Nickelodeon put up a YouTube video promoting something called 'The Splat' with a collection of cartoon characters from the 1990s all singing about the joys of Nickelodeon. You can watch that here:

And then, to make things even more official, a website was launched, but unfortunately it only says that The Splat is coming. Still no word on when or how or what this Splat thing is.

Buzzfeed found more evidence during Brooklyn's '90s Fest over the weekend.

Pauly Shore was seen with the logo:

And so was Coolio:

And those are some 1990s celebrities if we've ever seen them.

At this point, yes, The Splat is probably a thing that will show 1990s cartoons. But without official word of the what/where/when, we're just left with uncomfortable waiting and the slow realization that our childhood has passed us by, underlining the ultimate fact of mortality.


WIlliam stout shared images from a Jurassic Park cartoon that never was.
Via: moviefone
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Sit back and let me tell you about the 1990s, my children. It was a time when the Internet barely existed, when most soft drinks were transparent and when every popular movie had an accompanying Saturday morning cartoon.

That honor was almost bestowed upon 1993's classic Jurassic Park, based on original images released by William Stout on his website.

Check out these images:

Moviefone got some more information from Stout about what became of the neat-looking cartoon:

"We made a trailer to communicate the look and feel of the series, also showing how we would combine computer animation with traditional animation. All we needed was Spielberg's approval.

"I heard through the grapevine that [Spielberg] never bothered to watch what we had done," Stout said. "By that time, the word was out that he was burnt out on 'Jurassic Park' merchandising and all of the film's commercial exploitation. So, it never got made. Too bad."

With the crazy success of Jurassic World, you'd almost expect them to be exploring this all over again.

While we will probably never find a Garfield spin off as hilarious and existentially depressing as Garfield Minus Garfield, this comes close.

The artist behind Hetfield the Cat took the pretty great idea of using Metallica lyrics to express the despondent life of America's most overwrought cartoon cat.

Here are a few examples.

metal,lasagna,metallica,James Hetfield,tumblr,garfield,nothing else matters,cartoons
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Popular Belgian musician Stromae (aka Paul Van Haver) has a released a new video for his song “Carmen” which turns Twitter into a terrifying monster.

“Those fake smiles cut like a #. Watch yourself out there,” he says in the song. “Network friends and followers? No, no you’re just popular.”

It’s a reworking of “Habanera” from the opera Carmen, in which love is compared to a bird. He took that idea and made a version about Twitter.

The song is a commentary on how social media dominates our lives, and ironically he is promoting the new video on an Instagram account which he started a few weeks ago. It was directed by Sylvain Chomet, who worked on both “Triplets of Belleville” and “The Illusionist.”

“I’m not so radical about Twitter, but I think it’s sometimes dangerous if you think that Twitter is real life,” he told Time Out in an interview last year.

Stromae has a huge following in Europe and he is also popular with some world leaders, as both Nicolas Sarkozy and Barack Obama apparently own copies of one of his albums.

Here’s another of his hits called “Formidable,” which you may be familiar with. In the video, he walks around the streets of Brussels pretending to be drunk.

geek news homer simpson predicted higgs boson
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In a 1998 episode of “The Simpsons” called “The Wizard of Evergreen Terrace,” Homer knew about the Higgs boson (aka “God Particle”) many years before it was even discovered.

He is shown writing an equation on a chalkboard, which actually turns out to be a lot more than just a bunch of gibberish.

“That equation predicts the mass of the Higgs boson,” Simon Singh, author of The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets, told “The Independent”. “If you work it out, you get the mass of a Higgs boson that’s only a bit larger than the nano-mass of a Higgs boson actually is. It’s kind of amazing as Homer makes this prediction 14 years before it was discovered.”

Peter Higgs theorized about the particle in the ’60s, and it was finally discovered in 2012.

The writers on the show are all a bunch of math geeks, who have hidden easter eggs throughout the series since it premiered. Another of the equations Homer is working on in the same scene references Fermat’s Last Theorem, which Singh also has written about.

You can read more about the chalkboard scene and the math involved in this chapter from Singh’s book published at Boing Boing.

Here’s a more detailed explanation about the Higgs portion:

The first equation on the board is largely Schiminovich’s work, and it predicts the mass of the Higgs boson, M(H0), an elementary particle that that was first proposed in 1964. The equation is a playful combination of various fundamental parameters, namely the Planck constant, the gravitational constant, and the speed of light. If you look up these numbers and plug them into the equation,1 it predicts a mass of 775 giga-electron-volts (GeV), which is substantially higher than the 125 GeV estimate that emerged when the Higgs boson was discovered in 2012. Nevertheless, 775 GeV was not a bad guess, particularly bearing in mind that Homer is an amateur inventor and he performed this calculation fourteen years before the physicists at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, tracked down the elusive particle.

The Simpsons have also made headlines for “predicting” a number of other future events, including the Syrian civil war, the ebola outbreak, the Siegfried & Roy tiger attack, smartwatches andmalfunctioning voting booths.

But you would think as longest-running animated series in U.S. TV history that they would eventually get a few things right.

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