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Gunduz Agayev, an artist acclaimed for his work on illustration series such as, "Just Leaders", "War and Peace", and "Imagine" is back with a new collection he calls, "Transformers".

In this series Agayev casts politicians as transformers. Check out the leader of North Korea, the British Queen, and many others. Who'd administer unrivaled power over them all though?

Pretty sure this Putin could take Galvatron for a walk round the kickass block, while he juggled Soundwave and Starscream. Yeah, he'd be a Decepticon, for sure.

That Trump tidbit though. Are we even surprised?

Oh what's up Kim Jong-un?

Well Angela Merkel woke up on the right side of the bed.

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Tune in for a knockout performance from Kevin Kline's Calvin Fischoeder. Real talk though: how about those ice skating moves from his brother Felix, who looks graceful as a freaking swan.

Anyone else in the mood for a glass of something strong and distilled now? Take life on the rocks with bourbon, bourbon, oh bourbon, bourbon.

Makeup artist Rebecca Swift is absolutely killing the makeup impression game. Check out some of her best character and celebrity transformations:

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Transformation Tuesday of The Day: The Voice of Arnold From 'Hey Arnold!' is Now This Bearded God of a Man
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There is some serious thirst for Arnold, and it isn't coming all from Helga Pataki this time.

Lane Toran voiced the main character Arnold on Nickelodeon classic Hey Arnold during the first season. Now, he's a model and actor living in Los Angeles.

And the Internet has discovered he's a very, very good looking bearded man.

Here's Toran doing his thang on the very first episode of Hey Arnold!, which debuted on October 7, 1996.

And here's what he looks like now...

Move it, Football Head! Right into our hearts.

Disembodied Head of The Day: 'Donkey Kong' Champ's Lawsuit Against Cartoon Network Thrown Out
Via: Eurogamer
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If you watch Regular Show on Cartoon Network, you're probably aware of a character that goes by the name of GBF, an acronym for Garrett Bobby Ferguson or Giant Bearded Face.

The character is a giant head with tiny arms and legs that cheats at video games and explodes when he loses.

What you might not know is that this character is based on a real-life person, and he's not happy about this portrayal.

According to Eurogamer, actual Garrett Bobby Ferguson, who holds the world record on Donkey Kong and was the first to reach 1 million points on Ms. Pacman, had his lawsuit against Cartoon Network thrown out.

Mitchell objected to this portrayal and so launched a lawsuit against Cartoon Network for damages.

But the legal challenge has now been thrown out by New Jersey Federal District Judge Anne Thompson.

"The television character does not match the plaintiff in appearance," Thompson ruled (via AP). "GBF appears as a non-human creature, a giant floating head with no body from outer space, while Plaintiff is a human being.

"And when GBF loses his title, the character literally explodes, unlike Plaintiff."

GBF will live to explode another day.

Outrage of The Day: Is This Political Cartoon Calling Out The Kentucky Governor-Elect Racist?
Via: WKYT
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Kentucky's Gov.-elect Matt Bevin doesn't want Syrian refugees coming to his state. He is also a parent of multiple adopted children from Africa.

That's the hypocrisy cartoonist Joel Pett, who is now in serious hot water, tried to convey in a political cartoon published in the Lexington Herald-Leader.

But some are calling his cartoon, which shows Bevin cowering under his desk from pictures of his adopted children, racist.

Bevins called out the cartoonist on Twitter and said his children should be off-limits in political discussions.

Pett defended his cartoon in an editorial, saying it had nothing to do with the children and everything to do with Bevin's fear of Syrian refugees.

Did I attack his children? Of course not. Was the cartoon racist or critical of adopting children, as some are suggesting? The fact that he adopted children from Africa, a continent whose promise and challenges I routinely draw about, is the thing I admire the most about Bevin.

I did use the fact that he has children from another country in a piece designed to express outrage over a legitimate hot-button political issue. (Bevin used them in photo-ops and on TV commercials over the past two campaigns, but that's another story.) I did this with my name signed to it, in a newspaper with a long history of tolerating and publishing opinions of all persuasions and on a page labeled "opinion."

So, Internet. Racist or nah?

Nickelodeon explains the splat block of programming.
Via: AV Club
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After teasing this odd video last week, Nickelodeon finally gave up the goods on what exactly they will offer with The Splat.



The AV Club lays out some details:

Arriving Monday, Oct. 5 on TeenNick and all around the internet, The Splat is being billed as a "multiscreen content destination… aggregating the most beloved Nick content from the 1990s and beyond." And while that summary is egregiously grating, what it essentially means is that shows like All That, Are You Afraid Of The Dark?, Clarissa Explains It All, and Legends Of The Hidden Temple are coming back to TV (again) in the near future.

The Splat will take over TeenNick nightly from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., but will also live online at TheSplat.com and via an Emoji keyboard, so CatDog loving 30-somethings can Snapchat each other silly cartoons, or whatever. Viewers can also weigh in on what programming they want to see on the channel, something that TeenNick SVP Keith Dawkins told The A.V. Club is really going to help build the channel. As he put it in an interview, "the multiple screen experience allows us to listen to the audience in ways we never could years ago," noting that while shows like The Adventures Of Pete And Pete might not be on the initial list of shows on the network, that doesn't mean they won't show up down the road—provided there's demand. "It'll all be based on what the audience tells us they want," says Dawkins.



The preliminary website is still only in its rudimentary stage, but surely it will have a list of what shows will be playing and at what times.

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