Cat Signal of the Day

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Cat Signal of the Day
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January's Internet blackout and this year's mass protests against SOPA, PIPA, and CISPA were only the beginning.

Now, the Internet is getting a cat signal in defense of an open Internet -- and its launch, both virtual and IRL, is planned for the same night as next week's midnight showings of The Dark Knight Rises.

The cat signal is the brainchild of the Internet Defense League, "a network of people and sites who use their massive combined reach to defend the open internet and make it better":

So on Thursday night, as Hollywood's latest superhero movie opens in theaters for a midnight showing, IDL members in select cities can celebrate the launch around powerful spotlights rented for the occasion. The spotlights will beam the IDL's "cat-signal" into the stratosphere, across obliging clouds, or onto neighboring buildings. Parties like this are being planned in San Francisco, New York, Washington, DC, London and Ulaar Bataar, Mongolia (!) and a few more we haven't decided on yet.

Join the launch and/or help fund it here.

[idl]

CISPA Vote of the Day

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CISPA Vote of the Day
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By Unknown
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CISPA -- the most unpopular bill on the Internet, no matter what Facebook says -- passed late Thursday with a 248-168 vote in the GOP-controlled House.

What you might have missed, helpfully pointed out by Forbes' Andy Greenberg:

Even before it passed, the House voted to amend the bill to actually allow even more types of private sector information to be shared with government agencies, not merely in matters of cybersecurity or national security, but in the investigation of vaguely defined cybersecurity "crimes," "protection of individuals the danger of death or serious bodily harm," and cases where that involve the protection of minors from exploitation.

The CISPA fight now heads to the Democrat-controlled Senate. If the bill manages to reach his desk, President Obama has threatened a veto.

[death+taxes]

Follow-Up of the Day: Facebook Defends Its Support of CISPA

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Follow-Up of the Day: Facebook Defends Its Support of CISPA
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By Unknown
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Prompted by widespread Internet outcry against Facebook's support of CISPA, Joel Kaplan, the site's VP of U.S. Public Policy, has taken to the Facebook blog to defend his company's position, exlaining the difference between SOPA and CISPA and why the latter would help protect Facebook.

"One challenge we and other companies have had is in our ability to share information with each other about cyber attacks. When one company detects an attack, sharing information about that attack promptly with other companies can help protect those other companies and their users from being victimized by the same attack," Kaplan writes. "Similarly, if the government learns of an intrusion or other attack, the more it can share about that attack with private companies (and the faster it can share the information), the better the protection for users and our systems."

Kaplan made sure to address Facebook users' worries about privacy: "The concern is that companies will share sensitive personal information with the government in the name of protecting cybersecurity. Facebook has no intention of doing this."

CISPA will likely go to a full vote on the House floor later this month.

[mashable]

CISPA Continues to Make the Internet Mad News of the Day

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CISPA Continues to Make the Internet Mad News of the Day
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Late yesterday, the House Intelligence Committee released a discussion draft for CISPA. The draft attempts to clearly define what a cybersecurity threat would be, though one would speculate that the bill's origins probably come from a late-night screening of Live Free or Die Hard.

[mashable]


Follow-Up of the Day: Internets Revolt as Facebook Backs CISPA

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Follow-Up of the Day: Internets Revolt as Facebook Backs CISPA
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By Unknown
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Facebook (and also Microsoft, Verizon, AT&T, Intel...) has come out in support of CISPA -- SOPA's evil twin that essentially would obliterate online privacy -- and the wrath of the web has reached a fever pitch.

What's the best way to fight back?

Sign the petition by Demand Progress:

"Internet users were able to push GoDaddy to withdraw its support of SOPA. Now it's time to make sure Facebook knows we're furious."

And/or share your opposition on Facebook, natch.

[knowyourmeme]

This Is Important, You Should Know About It of the Day

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By Unknown
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The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act now has more than 105 co-sponsors, and some fear the bill could go further than SOPA and PIPA in threatening online privacy. SOPA and PIPA were finally discarded earlier this year after resounding online protest changed the debate, but the same doesn't yet appear to be the case with CISPA.

According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, H.R. 3523 "would let companies spy on users and share private information with the federal government and other companies with near-total immunity from civil and criminal liability. It effectively creates a 'cybersecurity' exemption to all existing laws."

The bill could sneak through Congress quickly once it's back in session, so be sure to track its progress.

[digitaljournal]