Facebook hoax going
Via: essaalroc
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The same chain-letter based hoax that floated around 2012 is back and scaring your family.

You might have noticed a flurry of action on your Facebook feed yesterday as people began copy and pasting what they believed was a legal notice, protecting the privacy of their profile data.

Stuff that looked like this:

As of September 27th , 2015 at 01:16 a.m. Eastern standard time, I do not give Facebook or any entities associated with...

Posted by Ines Ligron on Monday, September 28, 2015

Now it's official! It has been published in the media. Facebook has just released the entry price: $5.99 to keep the...

Posted by Stephani Victor on Monday, September 28, 2015

So, that's totally incorrect. Facebook has not threatened to make public the data contained in profiles and no mention has been made to charge for an upgraded privacy setting. Trust us. They're making a killing just doing what they're doing.

And even if they were, please do not believe that a status update will serve as a legally binding request to keep a business away from data that users are voluntarily putting on its servers. That's not how things work.

Luckily, not everyone took it seriously.

The messaging became so widespread that the company itself had to come out and warn users not to believe the hype.

While there may be water on Mars, don't believe everything you read on the internet today. Facebook is free and it...

Posted by Facebook on Monday, September 28, 2015

So, there you go. Your stuff won't be made public and status updates aren't binding legal statements.

Have a lovely day.

Facebook went down for about an hour and Fox News' Shep Smith couldn't care less.
Via: FoxNews
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Facebook went down for about an hour today. Are you OK?

Do you know who was totally fine about it? Fox News' Shepard Smith.

He provided a 'breaking news' update that sounded like more of a pointed rant than an actual bit of information. But hey, he knows his audience.

"...So, if you're all narcissistic and want to share every bit of your life with the world, uh they don't care anyway, and a few minutes off Facebook will not kill you."

He sounds a little bitter about it. Maybe people aren't responding to his friend requests or not poking him back.

Reactions were mixed.

You know how people do.

Friendship is a delicate thing, no matter where you live in the world.

It needs to be nurtured, protected and appreciated, otherwise it can prove a negative force to everyone involved.

No one knows this more than Asif Raza Rana, a Pakistani man just trying to find a good friend.

friendship,friends,Salman,facebook,Asif Raza Rana,Mudasir
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Obama, zuckerberg and more compliment Ahmed and offer support.
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Ever since the news broke about 9th grader Ahmed Mohamed getting arrested for bringing a homemade clock to school, #IStandWithAhmed has exploded and support has come from some very powerful people.

First, the President complimented the clock and extended an invite to the White House.

Then Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg applauded Ahmed's ingenuity and desire to build. And also extended an invitation to the company.

You’ve probably seen the story about Ahmed, the 14 year old student in Texas who built a clock and was arrested when he...

Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Support also came from politicians, comedians and businesses.

Facebook is preparing a dislike button
Via: Recode
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You know you hate just about most of the things that you see on Facebook. The baby pictures, the couples in gooey love, the political nonsense, the insanely inaccurate information, the list goes on forever and grows every day.

Well, rejoice, you cynical a**holes.

Mark Zuckerberg confirmed during a Facebook headquarters Q&A Sept. 15.

According to Re/code:

"I think people have asked about the dislike button for many years. Today is a special day because today is the day I can say we're working on it and shipping it," Zuckerberg said.

He told the audience that the company realized people want to express emotions other than positivity, especially around posts about sensitive subjects like the Syrian refugee crisis.

He didn't give further information as to what the "Dislike" button might look like. We could look to the new "reactions" product from workplace chatting app Slack as a possibility. Slack's reactions allow people to comment with a full range of emojis on others' posts, which leads to everything from check marks to laughter and food images to animated hands clapping.

We won't put all of our eggs in this thumbs down basket just yet. This is in direct opposition to what Zuckerberg said just nine months ago when he said there were no plans to introduce such a thing.

But if you'd like to take today's news as the truth, then strap on your dancin' hooves and get hatin'.

Woman Posts Engagement Photos With Life-Size Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Balloon Leonardo
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Turtle love is bodacious, dude!

That's what Jenn Kaminski, a self-described "unemployed creative" in LA, wants you to know. She's found true love, which just happens to be in the shape of a life-size Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Leonardo balloon.

The happy couple posted their announcement on Facebook this week in a set of hilarious engagement photos.

"Me and my bae decided to take a couple's photo shoot today. I think we look great," Kaminski wrote.

With the help of three of her friends, Kaminski was able to capture these precious moments forever. But why did they go through all of this trouble?

"We simply had a birthday balloon, an overabundance of free time and too many engagement photos in our Newsfeeds," they wrote.

Best wishes on your impending nuptials, Jenn and Leonardo. May your life be filled with years and years of pizza!

Facebook says 'lol' ain't happening.
Via: Facebook
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Inspired by an New Yorker article on expressing laughter, Facebook decided to see how it's billions of users choose to show their laughter.

While you would expect that 'lol' would take the cackling cake, because it was burned into our collective brains through insipid over-use during Internet's 2.0 days, it turns out those three terrible letters are on the decline. Facebook ran their analytic numbers and gave us several graphs to plot out how America chuckles online.

[W]hy rely on anecdotes when you have data? We analyzed de-identified posts and comments posted on Facebook in the last week of May with at least one string of characters matching laughter1. We did the matching with regular expressions which automatically identified laughter in the text, including variants of haha, hehe, emoji, and lol2.

As denizens of the Internet will know, laughter is quite common: 15% of people included laughter in a post or comment that week. The most common laugh is haha, followed by various emoji and hehe. Age, gender and geographic location play a role in laughter type and length: young people and women prefer emoji, whereas men prefer longer hehes. People in Chicago and New York prefer emoji, while Seattle and San Francisco prefer hahas.

Here's an overall usage of the four most common types of e-laughs:

Here's a gender analysis:

Here's a city evaluation:

Here's an age plotting:

If you're a maps person, here's a state by state break down:

Of course, the data is pretty compacted. There's no mention of 'lolz', 'lawlz' or even 'lololololololol'. Not to mention 'huehuehue'.

And where's this?

How do you laugh online as a digital expression with no inherent humanity?

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