Couple doesn't crop their photo enough in a Facebook engagement announcement.
Via: break
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Crop your photos, people.

This couple thought they were letting people into their personal lives by announcing their engagement over Facebook.

But there was more to the photo than initially met the eye and their family was quick on the uptake.

Break found the slip up:

After bride-to-be Miranda announced that her man had finally popped the question, it seemed that their world could be nothing short of a fairy tale. I mean, everyone woman lives to announce their engagement on facebook it seems. Hilariously enough, that magical moment didn't really seem to be the case because Miranda had already accidentally tipped off her friends to look a little closer at the photo. She stated that her boyfriend didn't give her an actual ring, assuring everyone it will come later, which did nothing other than make people lean in a little too close to check out that ring.

And that's when everyone also started noticing the weird box in the corner.

Yeah, that box? It was a pregnancy test.

The scene played out over Facebook comments and you can easily imagine the happy bride-to-be put the pieces together.

And then, the admission.

Congratulations to the happy couple!

Mark Zuckerberg unveils reactions as a thing instead of a dislike button.
Via: TechCrunch
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We wish we could dislike this story on Facebook.

Turns out we were right to be suspicious when we told you Mark Zuckerberg hinted at a 'dislike' button for Facebook last month.

Instead, Facebook revealed to TechCrunch Oct. 8, that the social network planned to 'supercharge' the existing 'Like' button by giving users some extra options on how to react.

Today, Facebook is taking the wraps off what form the new Like may take. It is rolling out "Reactions," a new set of six emoji that will sit alongside the original thumbs-up to let users quickly respond with love, laughter, happiness, shock, sadness and anger.

Facebook tells us that the pop-up feature will first start out as a test in two markets only, Spain and Ireland, before it decides whether to tweak it and/or how to roll it out further.

...The new set of reactions will appear across both mobile and desktop versions of the app and on all posts in the News Feed — be they from friends, Pages/accounts you follow, or advertisers. ...The reactions will work simply enough. On mobile, the emoji will come up when you touch the like button on your screen; on desktop they will come up as you hover the mouse over the like or click on it.

TechCrunch shows it as such:

Facebook Chief Product Officer Chris Cox even put up a video of what these Reactions will look like.

Today we're launching a pilot test of Reactions — a more expressive Like button. As you can see, it's not a "dislike" button, though we hope it addresses the spirit of this request more broadly. We studied which comments and reactions are most commonly and universally expressed across Facebook, then worked to design an experience around them that was elegant and fun. Starting today Ireland and Spain can start loving, wow-ing, or expressing sympathy to posts on Facebook by hovering or long-pressing the Like button wherever they see it. We'll use the feedback from this to improve the feature and hope to roll it out to everyone soon.

Posted by Chris Cox on Thursday, October 8, 2015

After a coworker posts a racist picture of Cayden Jace, his mother and grandmother start #HisNameIsCayden to fight back.
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Twitter won't take your racism lying down.

It proved as much Oct. 6 after a selfie of a white man with a three-year-old black child, and its very racist comments, went around Facebook.

According to The Huffington Post:

Cayden was at his mother's workplace in Atlanta when a coworker, identified by Atlanta Black Star as Gerod Roth but who uses the online alias of Geris Hilton, snapped an image of himself with the child in the background.

Roth posted the image on Facebook last month, and the comments quickly showed the Internet at its absolute worst. Roth's friends posted racist jokes and hateful commentary, including references to slavery.

"He was feral," Roth wrote in what appears to be his only comment.

Other comments included "I didn't know you were a slave owner", "But massah, I dindu nuffin" and "Send him back dude, those f*ckers are expensive...Like 25 cents a day".

Cayden's mother and grandmother were appalled to see the post from a coworker and wanted to humanize the boy they love. So they started #HisNameIsCayden and Twitter ran with it:

Roth's employer was not happy when they discovered the post:

This morning I was disgusted to learn that one of my former employees made several racially charged comments on his...

Posted by Polaris Marketing Group on Friday, October 2, 2015

Facebook hoax going
Via: essaalroc
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The same chain-letter based hoax that floated around 2012 is back and scaring your family.

You might have noticed a flurry of action on your Facebook feed yesterday as people began copy and pasting what they believed was a legal notice, protecting the privacy of their profile data.

Stuff that looked like this:

As of September 27th , 2015 at 01:16 a.m. Eastern standard time, I do not give Facebook or any entities associated with...

Posted by Ines Ligron on Monday, September 28, 2015

Now it's official! It has been published in the media. Facebook has just released the entry price: $5.99 to keep the...

Posted by Stephani Victor on Monday, September 28, 2015

So, that's totally incorrect. Facebook has not threatened to make public the data contained in profiles and no mention has been made to charge for an upgraded privacy setting. Trust us. They're making a killing just doing what they're doing.

And even if they were, please do not believe that a status update will serve as a legally binding request to keep a business away from data that users are voluntarily putting on its servers. That's not how things work.

Luckily, not everyone took it seriously.

The messaging became so widespread that the company itself had to come out and warn users not to believe the hype.

While there may be water on Mars, don't believe everything you read on the internet today. Facebook is free and it...

Posted by Facebook on Monday, September 28, 2015

So, there you go. Your stuff won't be made public and status updates aren't binding legal statements.

Have a lovely day.

Facebook went down for about an hour and Fox News' Shep Smith couldn't care less.
Via: FoxNews
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Facebook went down for about an hour today. Are you OK?

Do you know who was totally fine about it? Fox News' Shepard Smith.

He provided a 'breaking news' update that sounded like more of a pointed rant than an actual bit of information. But hey, he knows his audience.

"...So, if you're all narcissistic and want to share every bit of your life with the world, uh they don't care anyway, and a few minutes off Facebook will not kill you."

He sounds a little bitter about it. Maybe people aren't responding to his friend requests or not poking him back.

Reactions were mixed.

You know how people do.

Friendship is a delicate thing, no matter where you live in the world.

It needs to be nurtured, protected and appreciated, otherwise it can prove a negative force to everyone involved.

No one knows this more than Asif Raza Rana, a Pakistani man just trying to find a good friend.

friendship,friends,Salman,facebook,Asif Raza Rana,Mudasir
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Obama, zuckerberg and more compliment Ahmed and offer support.
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Ever since the news broke about 9th grader Ahmed Mohamed getting arrested for bringing a homemade clock to school, #IStandWithAhmed has exploded and support has come from some very powerful people.

First, the President complimented the clock and extended an invite to the White House.

Then Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg applauded Ahmed's ingenuity and desire to build. And also extended an invitation to the company.

You’ve probably seen the story about Ahmed, the 14 year old student in Texas who built a clock and was arrested when he...

Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Support also came from politicians, comedians and businesses.

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