Hacktivism of The Day: Anonymous Just Released The Contact Info of KKK Members
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It's a bad day to be in the KKK.

The hacktivist collective Anonymous just released the phone numbers and emails of about 40 alleged members of the Ku Klux Klan terrorist group.

You can view the full list here.

Anonymous said in a press release that about 1,000 more KKK members' information would be released in the coming days.

"The aim of this operation is digital. Another cyber war trist, nothing more. We are not violent," the press release states.

"We will release, to the global public, the identities of up to 1000 klan members, Ghoul Squad affiliates and other close associates of various factions of the Ku Klux Klan across the Unites States."

Samsung fridges are easily hacked for your email passwords.
Via: Daily Dot
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You know how everything connects to the Internet these days? Well, it looks like the refrigerators from Samsung aren't very smart about it.

A group of hackers discovered that they can easily scrape the fridge's information for Gmail passwords, thus giving you yet another reason to not trust your refrigerator, or techonology, or anything really.

As Daily Dot reports:

Security researchers at the firm Pen Test Partners found a flaw in Samsung's smart fridges that lets anyone with the right technical know-how intercept the Gmail username and password of the fridge's owner.

Ken Munro, one of the researchers, told the Register that the hack—known as a "man-in-the-middle" attack because of the way it intercepts the data—takes advantage of the fridge's Google Calendar feature.

"It appears to work the same way that any device running a Gmail calendar does," Munro said. "A logged-in user/owner of the calendar makes updates and those changes are then seen on any device that a user can view the calendar on."

As with all these new fangled things onto which we are just throwing all our über-personal information, we should really take care.

Don't tell your fridge your secrets or who knows what could happen.

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As part of Netflix’s “Hack Day,” some of their engineers got together and figured out a way to watch their programming in 8-bits on a Nintendo Entertainment System.

Why? Why not?

From their description:

In a world… where devices proliferate… darNES digs back in time to provide Netflix access to the original Nintendo Entertainment System.

It’s not exactly the best way to watch “House of Cards,” especially since we recently learned thatSeason 3 was filmed in 6k.

Some of the other projects highlighted include software that displays dialogue on the pause screen,a program that beeps when you try to look away from the screen and an interactive globe that lets you see what people are watching all over the world.

The event is intended to be just for fun, and most of the stuff that emerged isn’t likely to be in the hands of a consumer anytime soon.

“Note that while we think these hacks are very cool and fun, they may never become part of the Netflix product, internal infrastructure, or otherwise be used beyond Hack Day,” writes Netflix on their blog. “We are surfacing them here publicly to share the spirit of the event.”

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Between threats from Anonymous and a new crackdown from Twitter, ISIS is having a tough time reaching out and recruiting new psychopaths online.

To circumvent the censorship, the Islamic militant group has reportedly created its own social network called “Khelafabook.”

The Facebook clone claims it is independent and not actually sponsored by ISIS (even though it has ISIS logos all over its homepage). It says its goal is to show the world that they don’t only “live in caves” and “carry guns,” and they vow to “will rule the world by Allah’s permission.”

Khelafabook was set up by a man in Mosul, Iraq, according to The Independent, and is hosted in Egypt. There’s also an associated Twitter account which is linked to from the site.

The site first popped up last week, but has already been taken offline “to protect the info and details of its members,” according to a message on the page.


After it was taken down, Twitter accounts associated with Anonymous appeared to claim responsibility, as Vocativ points out.

For the the time being they’ll have to look elsewhere to share their terrorist pancake recipes.

Via: Claycord
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Facebook and Instagram were down for a brief period of time on Monday, and this was enough to send some people into a panic.

The local 911 dispatcher in the East Bay area of California told the Claycord blog that they received 5 different calls from people complaining about the outage.

“Our lines are [sic] dedicated to handle life and death calls, and even though Facebook is important to a lot of people, it’s not a matter of life and death when it stops working,” the dispatcher said. “One caller even called back to tell me I was being rude because I told her it wasn’t a life threatening emergency.”

The hacker group Lizard Squad initially claimed responsibility for the outage, but Facebook later issued a statement denying the group’s involvement.

“Earlier today many people had trouble accessing Facebook and Instagram,” they said. “This was not the result of a third party attack but instead occurred after we introduced a change that affected our configuration systems. We moved quickly to fix the problem, and both services are back to 100% for everyone.”

Fortunately it only lasted an hour, so these 5 terrible people were able to quickly get back to posting selfies, babies and gross food pictures. PHEW.

twitter,news,hacked,isis,Probably bad News
Via: Al Jazeera
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Social media accounts belonging the United States Central Command were hacked on Monday by a group claiming to be ISIS sympathizers.

The attack comes at the same time that President Obama is promoting his plans to bolster cybersecurity.

The hackers posted a number of eerie warnings on the Twitter account @CENTCOM, which has since been suspended. They changed the profile images to those in the photo above with the words "CyberCaliphate" and "I love you ISIS."

"AMERICAN SOLDIERS, WE ARE COMING, WATCH YOUR BACK. ISIS," they wrote. They also posted spreadsheets with contact info for retired U.S. army generals and maps of North Korea and China. Nothing posted was classified, however, and it is all available publicly online.

Their YouTube account was compromised as well with two new videos added called "Flames of War ISIS Video" and "O Soldiers of Truth Go Forth," according to Reuters.

"We can confirm that the U.S. Central Command's Twitter and YouTube accounts were compromised earlier today. We are taking appropriate measures to address the matter," Centcom said in a statement.

Another tweet linked to the following message on Pastbin:

"While the US and its satellites kill our brothers in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan we broke into your networks and personal devices and know everything about you," they wrote. "You'll see no mercy infidels. ISIS is already here, we are in your PCs, in each military base. With Allah's permission we are in CENTCOM now. We won't stop! We know everything about you, your wives and children. U.S. soldiers! We're watching you!"

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Over the weekend, reports emerged that the Ku Klux Klan passed out fliers and warnings indicating they would enact "lethal force" against Ferguson protesters should they display aggression in response to the grand jury hearing of the Michael Brown shooting.

Hactivist group Anonymous did not take kindly to these threats.

As of the morning November 16, the Ku Klux Klan still had control over their own tweets, as you're seeing from their official Twitter feed here (who knew that abject hate could be so tuned in to social media trends?). Just later that evening Anonymous seized the Twitter account to use to their own ends, changing its profile picture to their own iconic image and tweeting things like this:

The moral of the story is the same as always: Just don't bother getting on Anonymous's bad side.

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