lego

lego,calculation,engineering,theory
Via: BBC
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According to a recent study by BBC Radio's statistical literacy program More or Less, the tallest stable LEGO structure would be comprised of 375,000 lego bricks and stand 3.5km (2.17 miles) high before the brick at the base of the tower finally gave in to the weight. The current world record for the tallest LEGO structure was set in 2011 by Sao Paulo's multi-colored monolith made from 500,000 bricks that is 102 feet and 3 inches tall. Hat tip goes to BoingBoing.

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Japanese LEGO artist Akiyuky spent over 600 hours to create this complex, Rube Goldberg machine-like assembly line that stretches over 100 feet in length.

By Unknown
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YouTuber ZaziNombies makes life-size LEGO replicas of your favorite weapons from FPS video games like Halo, Skyrim and Minecraft among others. In this one, he presents his recreation of The Modern Submachine Carbine (MSMC) as featured in Call of Duty: Black Ops 2.



LEGO Craftsmanship of the Day is a new feature series dedicated to spotlighting some of the finest brick works made out of LEGO blocks.

Via: Talapz
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Japanese LEGO brick artist Talapz showcases his super intricate pop-up model of Tōdai-ji, a well-known Zen Buddhist temple in Nara, Japan.

3d,art,lego,design,new york city
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New York-based artist JR Schmidt designed this 3D topographical model of New York City based on a pixel-by-pixel rendering of Google Map's satellite imagery.

Hat tip goes to This Isn't Happiness.



Artsy Fart of the Day is a feature series dedicated to showcasing a colorful range of visual arts in digital and traditional mediums.

lego,ISS,internet,science,rover,space
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NASA & ESA recently announced that an American astronaut onboard the International Space Station has successfully operated a LEGO-built rover at the European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, using an experimental version of planet-to-planet Internet called Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) protocol. NASA's experts say once DTN is ready for deployment, it could be used to control robots on Mars from an orbiting spacecraft or even from Earth using satellites as relay stations.

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