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Nasa releases a new picture of earth.
Via: NASA
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One of NASA's newest photographic satellite, with the express mission to continually monitor Earth, has come online and given us the first complete photo of our home planet in over 40 years

It's called Deep Space Climate Observatory or DSCOVR, and NASA boasted about the new stunning picture it provided.



On February 11, 2015, DSCOVR was finally lofted into space by a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. After journey of about 1.6 million kilometers (1 million miles) to the L1 Lagrange Point, the satellite and its Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth. At L1—four times farther than the orbit of the Moon—the gravitational pull of the Sun and Earth cancel out, providing a stable orbit and a continuous view of Earth. The image above was made by combining information from EPIC's red, green, and blue bands. (Bands are narrow regions of the electromagnetic spectrum to which a remote sensing instrument responds. When EPIC collects data, it takes a series of 10 images at different bands—from ultraviolet to near infrared.)



Now surely, you're thinking, "But I've seen many pictures of Earth that have been taken since 1972." Well, that's rude of you to interrupt, but NASA explained away your thoughts:

While NASA has released other blue marble images over the years, these have mostly been mosaics stitched together with image processing software—not a single view of Earth taken at one moment in time.



Yep, that's us! Right there! If you live in North, Central or the northern part of South America, you can probably see your house from there.

science-win-nasa-mars-sunset-rover
Via: NASA
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In case you were curious, here is what an alien sees before he/she/it goes to sleep.

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover captured the above image on April 15, and it’s being described as the first sunset observed in color by the spacecraft.

The photos were taken last month, but they were just sent back to Earth last week.

While Mars may appear red, the sunset is actually blue, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory explains why this is possible:

Dust in the Martian atmosphere has fine particles that permit blue light to penetrate the atmosphere more efficiently than longer-wavelength colors. That causes the blue colors in the mixed light coming from the sun to stay closer to sun’s part of the sky, compared to the wider scattering of yellow and red colors. The effect is most pronounced near sunset, when light from the sun passes through a longer path in the atmosphere than it does at mid-day.

Curiosity first landed on Mars’s Gale Crater in August 2012 with a mission of determining whether or not Mars is or ever was habitable by life forms.

Here’s an animated GIF of the sunset, which uses a series of photos takes over a period of about 6 minutes, 51 seconds. The sight apprently inspired the rover to recite some lines from T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” on its Twitter account.



Via: AP
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NASA successfully launched its unmanned Orion spacecraft on Friday, the first step in a new era of deep space exploration which could one day lead to humans on Mars.

This 4.5-hour long test marks the furthest a ship built for humans has gone since the Apollo 17 mission in 1972 - 15 times as far as the International Space Station into deep space.

It will make two orbits around the earth before soaring back down to Earth to test its heat shields and parachutes.

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden Jr. has dubbed this "Day One of the Mars era," which will be followed by an attempt to capture an asteroid in the 2020s, and the ultimate goal of eventually reaching Mars in the 2030s.

Where this little guy will be waiting for us…

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This newly released video has developed quite the controversy. The NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies has created this short clip that visualizes the warming of Earth over the past 60 years. Supporters of the Global Warming theory feel that the video is solid proof of a dangerous trend while skeptics argue that 60 years is too short of a time period to fully understand climate change.

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On a mission to Jupiter with an arrival scheduled for July 4, 2016, NASA's Juno spacecraft captured this footage of the Moon orbiting Earth from a distance of about 600,000 miles. As it passed our planet, the spacecraft accelerated to more than 8,800 MPH in order to reach its final destination.

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