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Via: 14news
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If its just a regular rainbow, the people of Isle of Palms in South Carolina aren't interested anymore.

They were treated to the rare meteorological spectacle known as a 'fire rainbow' Aug. 17 and nothing will ever be the same.

Look at this thing:



The local news station explained the phenomenon:

According to Meteorologist Justin Lock, a strict set of conditions are required for fire rainbows to appear. First, they only occur in high-level cirrus clouds made up of tiny ice crystals.

"To produce the rainbow colors the sun's rays must enter the ice crystals at a precise angle to give the prism effect of the color spectrum," Lock said, adding the sun must be at an altitude of at least 58 degrees above the horizon. "Again, it has to do with getting the precise angle."

Lock says we often see the same kind of thing occur with colorful sunsets in which high-level cirrus clouds produce many colors because of the low angle of the sun reflecting and diffracting light, producing brilliant reds, oranges and purples.



It took off on social media as well and Instagram rejoiced.

Without clarity. So beautiful

A photo posted by Carole Rich Williams (@icrw70) on





Somehow it's actually prettier than that time lightning and a rainbow got in a fight.

It's a beautiful world, y'all.

Photographer Greg McCown gets a killer picture of lightning over a rainbow.
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Zeus celebrates Pride.

Photographer Greg McCown captured this incredible picture of a bolt of lighting streaking through a clear arcing rainbow.

As McCown says on his Facebook page:

Finally! After years of trying I finally got my lightning and rainbow picture. What an awesome evening. I headed out late afternoon, shot a little on the SE side, then drove across town catching up with Bryan Snider and Chris Frailey, two awesome photographers/stormchasers. We shot for a little while, then got dumped on by a microburst while driving up the freeway. I-10 slowed to a near crawl, with half the traffic pulling over and stopping completely. Can't blame them as visibility dropped to 20 feet. At the next stop Bryan and Chris headed NW back towards home and I headed SE towards this rainbow. I was just trying to find a foreground without telephone poles or other junk in the way. Found it just in time as this was the last bolt to strike before the storm dissipated into nothing.



It's certainly not the only pretty picture McCown has taken. You can see a whole lot of beautiful shots on his website.

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The country experienced some very weird weather over the weekend, especially Colorado.

A group of storm chasers spotted the “Wizard of Oz” IRL Saturday in Eads, and they captured the unusual sight in the video above.

Rain-nado or Torn-bow? You decide.

A photo was also posted to Facebook and Twitter, with some commenters wondering if it was Photoshopped.

Although the video footage proves otherwise.

“Somewhere over the rainbow in Colorado today, there was another rainbow, with a tornado above it!” the Basehunters wrote on Facebook. “An incredible sight to witness in person!”

Sure it’s cool to see, but it’s probably not a great idea to try to find the pot of gold in this case.

Meanwhile in Denver, late season snow on Sunday made for some unpleasant conditions to play baseball, but they did anyway.

The Colorado Rockies tweeted pictures of Coors Field blanketed in snow Sunday ahead of theirafternoon game against the LA Dodgers.

Go home Mother Nature, you’re drunk.

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Via: CNN
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And then it rained Skittles, and they all rejoiced.

Navy photographer Ignacio Perez captured the above image Tuesday of the USS John C. Stennis passing through a rainbow in the Pacific Ocean.

“As a photographer I am used to documenting operational events like aircraft launches and recoveries,” he told CNN. “But when I saw the rainbow I was excited because it was different. I knew the odds of the ship passing near another rainbow were pretty slim.”

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Via: HyperVocal
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The day after Hurricane Sandy blew through New York City, Hy Chalmé snapped this photo for Instagram on 81st and 3rd, looking toward Central Park.

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