What's the Deal of the Day: Jerry Seinfeld Reveals Some Kind of Reunion

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What's the Deal of the Day: Jerry Seinfeld Reveals Some Kind of Reunion
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Just a few weeks ago, Jerry Seinfeld, Jason Alexander, and Larry David were all spotted hanging around the restaurant made famous by their award winning sitcom. Originally said to be a location for Jerry's web series, he recently (and vaguely) revealed that this secret project will be a Seinfeld reunion of sorts.




After giving an extremely vague interview to WFAN's "Boomer & Carton" show, producer Al Dukes pressed Jerry further which suggested the possibility of this reunion project to air sometime during the Super Bowl.

Game of Thrones as a Seinfeld Sitcom

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YouTuber MatinComedy puts a Seinfeld-like sitcom spin into a scene from the popular medieval fantasy TV series Game of Thrones. It's amazing what a laugh track can do.

Collaboration of the Day

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We thought this day would never come: With a new tagline -- "Soup for you! Soup for everyone!" -- Jason Alexander has partnered with the Original SoupMan as a celebrity spokesman.

"We had one of the greatest episodes of Seinfeld ever, somewhat at his expense," Alexander says. "But now, I get to make amends by helping bring his recipes to everyone."

And just like that, George Costanza and the Soup Nazi have made their peace.

[thedailymeal]

George Is Getting Upset of the Day

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George Is Getting Upset of the Day
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George Is Getting Upset of the Day: Mitt Romney loves to quote George Costanza at debates and rallies. He's done it at least three times in the past, including during last night's CNN debate.

Except he gets it wrong every time.

"As George Costanza would say, when they're applauding, stop," he told last night

RIP: Ian Abercrombie, at 77

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RIP: Ian Abercrombie, at 77
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RIP: Ian Abercrombie, a veteran British character actor who is best remembered for his role as Mr. Pitt on Seinfeld, passed away Thursday in Hollywood at age 77.

Abercrombie has played dozens of parts over the years since his start in a 1955 production of Stalag 17.

Though he is best known to many