space

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

The galaxy in question looks a little fuzzy, but that's probably because it's so far away. A lot of the things we see from space are actually past versions of themselves because the light from the object took several years to get here. According to the video description, the light from this galaxy, blurry as it may be, took a very, very long time to get to the Hubble space telescope:

This animation shows the location of galaxy GN-z11, which is the farthest galaxy ever seen. The video begins by locating the Big Dipper, then showing the constellation Ursa Major. It then zooms into the GOODS North field of galaxies, and ends with a Hubble image of the young galaxy. GN-z11 is shown as it existed 13.4 billion years in the past, just 400 million years after the big bang, when the universe was only three percent of its present age.


This new development is record breaking and astronomers don't expect to beat it anytime soon until the launch of a new, larger observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope.


via NASA

Astronaut Scott Kelly was brought safely home last night after spending nearly a year in space. He was primarily in space to study himself to learn about how human bodies change in space. He even has an identical twin who stayed back on Earth to compare results. But what else was he doing for so long up on the International Space Station? He actually kept a pretty good record on Twitter.

list,scott kelly,science,astronaut,space
View List
  • -
  • Vote
  • -
space science image The Hubble Took an Image of a 'Blue Bubble' That Is Actually a Nebula
Via: @NASA
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

The Hubble Space Telescope took this image of a star that looks like it's inside a blue bubble. NASA says the blue bubble is actually a nebula formed around 20,000 years ago. This is how it's described on the Hubble's website:

The distinctive blue bubble appearing to encircle WR 31a is a Wolf–Rayet nebula — an interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other gases. Created when speedy stellar winds interact with the outer layers of hydrogen ejected by Wolf–Rayet stars, these nebulae are frequently ring-shaped or spherical.


According to NASA, these type of stars don't last very long (in terms of bodies in space at least). It'll only be around for a "few hundred thousand years".


  • -
  • Vote
  • -

This beautiful video is a look at a map of the Milky Way that was just released. The video description explains in detail about how the image was made:

This video takes a close look at a new image of the Milky Way released to mark the completion of the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL). The APEX telescope in Chile has mapped the full area of the Galactic Plane visible from the southern hemisphere for the first time at submillimetre wavelengths — between infrared light and radio waves — and in finer detail than recent space-based surveys.

The APEX data, at a wavelength of 0.87 millimetres, shows up in red and the background blue image was imaged at shorter infrared wavelengths by the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the GLIMPSE survey. The fainter extended red structures come from complementary observations made by ESA's Planck satellite.
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

In preparation for his return to Earth, astronaut Scott Kelly decided to have a little fun. When he returns he'll have stayed been in space for 520 consecutive days, a US record. He's also given a not as funny interview reflecting on his one year mission.

Amazing how much lightning can strike our planet in a short timeFlying from North Africa over Turkey towards Russia in this timelapse (this is speeded up; travelling about 5500 km would take around 10-12 minutes, covered here in 30 seconds).

Posted by Tim Peake on Tuesday, February 9, 2016
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Astronaut Tim Peake posted a time lapse video from the International Space Station (ISS) that caught a particularly striking view of lightening as it flew over Earth. According to the caption, all these lightening strikes happened in a matter of minutes:

Flying from North Africa over Turkey towards Russia in this timelapse (this is speeded up; travelling about 5500 km would take around 10-12 minutes, covered here in 30 seconds).


As the ISS orbits the Earth astronauts living in the space station have the chance to take amazing time lapse video like this and others.

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

What are these glorious golden space swirls? According to NASA, who captured this video with the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), this happened when a dark solar filament erupted and caused a chain reaction.They call these cascading magnetic arches because what you see here is a lot of particles spinning around the sun's magnetic field lines. 

Here's a video where you can see what a dark solar filament looks like. The darker area, almost in the shape of a circle is it. Filaments are plasma held above the sun's surface by magnetic forces. 




Back to Top