Street Art

Instagram of The Day: Artist is Sharing The 'Good News' With Punny Street Signs
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Have you heard the good news?

South African artist Jaco Haasbroek is out to make sure that you do.

His art project, The Good News, places posters of happy news (often with puns) around the city to brighten people's day.

He told Mashable he started the project after seeing a missing dog sign that said "STOLEN."

"It's quite sad when someone loses a pet," he said. "The idea popped into my head that by simply adding 'Our Hearts' at the bottom of the poster, it would completely change its meaning and turn into something positive."

You can check out more of the project on Haasbroek's Instagram.

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Back in February, world-famous street artist Banksy posted several new pieces in Gaza, including a giant kitten, to try to draw some attention to the region.

His public work tends to be snatched up pretty quickly by people looking to make some serious cash. They can typically be sold to collectors for hundreds of thousands of dollars. His “Mobile Lovers” piece went for more than half a million dollars last year.

One man in Gaza probably wishes he had been told that before he let an original Banksy go for a measly $175.

Rabie Dardouna, who owned the door and rubble which Banksy adorned with a piece called “Bomb Damage” (above), pawned it off to a man named Belal Khaled for just the value of the metal. His house was destroyed during an Israeli attack last year.

“I did not know that it was this valuable. I heard it can be sold for millions,” Dardouna told The Guardian. “Now I want the door back.”

Khaled claims he only purchased the door to “protect its artistic value” and isn’t looking to make money off the deal.

He added that he might one day consider displaying it in a gallery to “speak about the suffering of Gaza and the agonies of war.”

Via: Dezeen
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The Netherlands has just unveiled its second coolest bike path, a glow-in-the-dark stretch of road that displays illuminated patterns based on Vincent van Gogh's famous painting "Starry Night."

The kilometer-long path, designed by Daan Roosegaarde in association with his "Smart Highways" project, runs through the province of Noord Brabant, where Van Gogh grew up.

It consists of thousands of stones covered in special paint which charge during the day and light up at night.

As a backup - in case the path doesn't get enough of a charge during the day - there are additional LED lights along the side that are charged by an accompanying solar panel.
"I wanted to create a place that people will experience in a special way, the technical combined with experience, that's what techno-poetry means to me," said Roosegaarde.

Earlier this week another path was opened up for use by SolaRoad, which contains built-in solar panels to generate electricity.

Parisian street artist Etienne Lavie took garish public advertisements and replaced them with works of classical art, invoking the history of the city and French art culture as a whole. Check them out here!

Hat tip to The Awesomer.

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