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Syracuse University professor Sam Van Aken made a tree that gives 40 different kind of fruit.
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Talk about a tree that keeps on giving.

National Geographic released this video of Syracuse University professor Sam Van Aken greatest creation: a tree graphted with 39 other branches that grows a total of 40 different fruit varieties.

The mad scientist Art Professor grows different types of cherries, peaches, plums, nectarines and apricots that bloom through out the year.

Look at this strikingly beautiful abomination of nature:



Syracuse.com tells how the whole offense to God happened:

[Van Aken] explains that grafting works by slicing branches with buds from one tree and inserting it into a matching slit in a branch on the Tree of 40 Fruit. He wraps the wound with tape, and as it heals the bud grows into a new branch.

"It's a metaphor for a lot of things," Van Aken told The Post-Standard in 2011, when he planted a tree on the SU quad. He added that he specifically chose 40 because it appears often in the Bible: "It's a number that represents bounty."





Van Aken describes the project as a living work of art, though he has admitted it could have implications for genetic engineering and preserving different fruit varieties against food monocultures. He adds more branches from other varieties each year, and a completed Tree of 40 Fruit takes nearly a decade, but the wait is worth it.



He said it began when he stumbled upon an abandoned orchard growing wild and not when he had meglomaniacal delusions of grandeur.

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Tumblr blogger Crummywater gears up for the holiday season with a Tumblr-themed Christmas tree. Check out the original post for close up shots!

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The Root Bridges of Cherrapunji refer to bridges that are woven from the roots of living rubber trees in the Cherrapunji rainforests of Meghalaya, India. Some of them are more than a hundred feet long, grow over decades and withstand the weight of fifty people. Not only are they environmentally friendly, the bridges are also quite utilitarian since the roots grow stronger over their lifespan. For more info, check out this BBC video.

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