trolling

sienfeld advice Trolled Advice Columnist Wraps Up an Episode of Seinfeld in One Paragraph
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An unknown prankster sent in the plot of a two-part Seinfeld episode to the advice columnist Amy Dickenson. The episode in question is called "The Boyfriend" and just as the prankster writes, it deals with Jerry meeting his sports idol who then goes on to date Elaine. 

Amy answered as if it was any other question with a short paragraph that offers solid advice and would have probably cut the end of the episode very short.

She admits on her own website that she missed the joke but she seems pretty good humored about it:

Every once in awhile, I get punked by a villainous, fun-loving reader. I have some affection for these episodes because I often think that if I didn’t actually have a job, punking advice columnists is exactly what I would do with my time. But alas I do have a job and so I am left with the task of sharing my humiliation, as well as trying to enjoy readers’ reactions.


Here's the beginning of the episode in question:

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Stanford ran train over Michigan State on Saturday, bringing home an impressive 45-16 Rose Bowl victory.

Christian McCaffery put on a heroic performance as the game's star running-back, but the poor kid couldn't catch a break from an adrenaline-charged douche who did everything but grab the fu*king microphone and chuck it through the goalpost during McCaffery's interview.

Real-talk bro, GTFO. There's fan, superfan, and whatever the heck that guy in the background was. Don't be that guy.

guy edits bands wikipedia page to get backstage has beer with peking duk
Via: Peking Duk
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David Spargo apparently really wanted to meet the band "Peking Duk," so much so that he was willing to poorly edit the band's Wikipedia entry in order to convince a security guy he belonged backstage. Lucky for him, it worked.



The ill-placed and poorly formatted "Family David Spargo" was legit enough to dupe a surprisingly gullible security guard into letting David past him, where he introduced himself to the band:

"We ended up having a bunch of beers with him and he was an absolute legend. He wasn’t a creep or anything. He was like the most normal dude we’ve ever met. That’s what makes it more hilarious."

Was it worth it? Absolutely. 



Would it work a second time? Probably not.

activism-trolls-racist-internet-trolls-are-seeing-their-terrible-comments-put-up-on-billboards
Via: ITV
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A Brasilian campaign called "Virtual Racism, Real Consequences" has placed Billboards in the home towns of racist internet denizens featuring their hurtful posts alongside a blurred out image and username of the offender. The project used Facebook's geo-tagging function to locate the commenters.  

The organizers of the project don't want to identify anyone or give trolls more attention which is why the identifying information is blurred out. They hope that people who made these comments will come across their own words in a very public venue and realize the impact of their comments has more reach than the semi-anonymty of the internet. 

They have also created a video to better explain their efforts :

troll of the day cards against humanity selling nothing for black friday
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If you're the kind of person who impulse buys a good deal on Black Friday without really seeing what you're getting, you may have just bought a whole lot of nothing from Cards Against Humanity. Then again, you were probably also one of the more than 30,000 people who bought actual poop from them last Black Friday.

Cards Against Humanity, the troll kings of Black Friday, are offering a special $5 deal on absolutely nothing! As in, you give them five dollars and get nothing back. Apparently they've also closed real sales of their product today, which has at least one former-fan pretty furious:



Something tells me that if this stunt was enough to turn this guy off of CAH, he probably wouldn't have enjoyed the game to begin with.

Hoax of The Day: 'Phuc Dat Bich' Just Trolled The Entire Internet
Via: Guardian
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Phuc Dat Bich is a phucing liar.

The man who claimed Facebook was deleting his profile every time he updated it to his unfortunate-sounding name now tells Guardian Australia he made the whole thing up.

His real name is Tin Lee, a 23 year old living in Melbourne.

The trickster fooled the people of the Internet and countless publications (including Cheezburger) with a Facebook post lamenting his name.

He had this to say about his hoax in a Facebook post, which now seems to have been deleted:

"What started as a joke between friends, became a prank that made a fool out of the media and brought out the best in the people who reached out to me. It didn't bring out the anger and darkness that we often see on the internet, but it brought a levity and humanity in a time we need it most.

"Out of this ordeal I've concluded not to trust the credibility of the media, it's twisted by the hungry journalists who mask the truth ... It goes to show that an average joe like myself can con the the biggest news sources with ease."

What a Bich.

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