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While the East Coast was dealing with a blizzard, Arizona was getting unnaturally hot, according toFOX 10 Phoenix.

An malfunction on their weather map made it appear as if the temperatures were going to be in the thousands this week, but meteorologist Cory McCloskey handled it like a pro.

“Now I’m not authorized to evacuate Ahwatukee,” he said of a city reported to be 1270 degrees, “But this temperature seems pretty high.”

It’s also supposed to be a sweltering 2960 degrees in Cave Creek and 2385 in Wickenburg.

“I think steel boils at this temperature,” he said. “So Cave Creek… there’s probably nothing left up there. So don’t even bother looting up there.”

Fox 10 wrote about the error on their Facebook page:

“In the world of live news sometimes technology just doesn’t cooperate,” they said. “That’s why it’s important to have smart people who can handle the heat.”

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Around six-feet of snow covered the Buffalo area Tuesday, thanks to a lake-effect snowstorm, trapping residents and stopping traffic. Deaths have been reported as well, 3 of which were from heart attacks.

And another 2-feet of snow is reportedly on the way. Not good.

Here's some news you might have missed:

Gov. Cuomo has deployed the National Guard [NY Daily News]

A drone toughed out the storm, and the footage is insane. (see video above) [James Grimaldi]

For some reason, the University at Buffalo did not cancel classes, and commenters on Facebook found this very amusing. [dan_blather]



The storm did not stop this baby from being born. [WIVB]

Some suburbs around Buffalo got close to breaking the record for 24-hour snowfall [NWS Buffalo]

This photo is why flying is probably NOT a good idea during a storm. [USA Today]



Here's your lake effect. Someone shot a timelapse of the storm as it crossed over Lake Erie into the city. [Alfonzo Cutaia]

And as always: the memes are coming. [scy1192]

gifs,weather,amazing,mothership supercell,earth
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A supercell thunderstorm is characterized by a sustained and powerful rotating updraft. These storms originate in unstable air accompanied by a particular type of changing wind direction at various altitudes in the atmosphere; a common combination supportive of supercells is a southerly or southeasterly wind near ground level and a southwesterly or westerly wind higher up in the atmosphere.

This combination of changing wind directions creates a horizontal rolling motion in the lower atmosphere. The same rapidly rising air motions that form the thunderstorm turn this horizontal rotation into a vertical rotation, and in the case of this particular storm, this rotation is spectacularly evident in the circular striations, or layers, visible in the cloud structure.

The structure of supercell thunderstorms allows rain and hail to fall well away from the source of the warm, unstable air fueling the storm, so these storms do not choke on their own rain-cooled air. In some cases this allows supercell thunderstorms to stay intact for hours, covering tens or even hundreds of miles. In the process they can produce giant hail, very high winds, and tornadoes.
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