Science of The Day: Coyotes and Wolves Are Mating to Create The 'Coywolf'
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There a new species emerging right before scientist's eyes. And this doesn't happen very often.

Because of a lack of other wolves to mate with, scientists believe they are mating with coyotes and dogs to create an entirely new species: the coywolf.

The number of coywolf has grown into the millions in northeastern North America during the last century.

According to The Economist:

The mixing of genes that has created the coywolf has been more rapid, pervasive and transformational than many once thought. Javier Monzón, who worked until recently at Stony Brook University in New York state (he is now at Pepperdine University, in California) studied the genetic make-up of 437 of the animals, in ten north-eastern states plus Ontario. He worked out that, though coyote DNA dominates, a tenth of the average coywolf's genetic material is dog and a quarter is wolf.

The DNA from both wolves and dogs (the latter mostly large breeds, like Doberman Pinschers and German Shepherds), brings big advantages, says Dr Kays. At 25kg or more, many coywolves have twice the heft of purebred coyotes. With larger jaws, more muscle and faster legs, individual coywolves can take down small deer. A pack of them can even kill a moose.

Basically the combination of wolf, coyote and dog DNA has created super fast killing machines.

Hold your children close, America.

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Rep. Don Young of Alaska certainly has problems, but wolves aren’t one of them.

At a House Natural Resources Committee hearing this week, Young was complaining about how members of Congress were rallying together to help protect the gray wolf, when they don’t have to deal with them on a regular basis like he does.

“How many of you have got wolves in your district?” he asked. “None. None. Not one.”

And then, likely due to a full moon, he offered up this completely insane proposal.

“I’d like to introduce them to your district,” he said. “You wouldn’t have a homeless problem anymore.”

A spokesperson for Young later clarified to the Washington Post that the “analogy was purposely hyperbolic to stress the point that these predators pose serious threats to wildlife management and their listing has damaging impacts to local communities.”

Alaska has “the largest remaining population of gray wolves in the United States,” according to Defenders of Wildlife.

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