hacks

Two suicides in Toronto have been linked to the Ashley Madison hacks.
Via BBC
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Releasing the private information hacked out of infidelity website Ashley Madison has caused more than public shaming and viral disillusionment. Toronto police announced that two suicides were connected to the data leak Aug. 24.



According to the BBC:

Two individuals associated with the leak of Ashley Madison customer details are reported to have taken their lives, according to police in Canada.

The police in Toronto gave no further information about the deaths.

...Addressing the hackers, known as The Impact Team, acting staff superintendent Bryce Evans of the Toronto police said: "I want to make it very clear to you your actions are illegal and we will not be tolerating them. This is your wake-up call." Police are seeking information from members of the wider hacker community that might aid their investigation.

The breach was "very sophisticated", said Detective Menard from the technological crime unit of Toronto Police.



Ashley Madison's leadership isn't taking this lightly. Their Canadian parent company Avid Life Media has put up a C$500,000 bounty on information for the hackers.

Information on more than 33 million accounts has been stolen from the website and reports have already surfaced of it being used for blackmail and extortion.

If you are struggling with suicidal thoughts consider seeking help through the many available services and hotlines. The 24-hour National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1 (800) 273-8255 and their website is www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

news hacks gaming leaks psn Video Game Coverage - 8382999296
Via CNET
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Time to change those passwords again!

In a move to pressure game companies to update their servers and prevent cyberattacks, a hacker group named DerpTrolling has posted thousands of usernames and passwords from PSN, 2K Games and Windows Live.

"Dear Internet, the following is a very small portion of Lord Gaben and the rest of his crews glorious raids across the high seas of the Internet," the group said.

The document they released contains info on 2,131 PSN users, 1,473 Windows Live users and 2,000 2K Game Studios users, but they say they have access to alot more data (around 7 million usernames and passwords) which has not been leaked… yet.

The group also claimed resposibility for a DDoS attack on Blizzard's "World of Warcraft" servers last weekend.