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Photos Of Jupiter That Are Out Of This World

Jupiter, the giant in our solar system, has fascinated humans since we first looked up to the skies. We got our first glimpse of Jupiter 45 years ago, and since then, astronomers haven't been able to get enough of the giant planet. Unfortunately, Jupiter is not easy to travel to: at 338 times Earth's mass, Jupiter has the largest magnetic field in the solar system, meaning that anything that gets close (by close we mean millions of miles) will get fried by radiation, including life-saving electronics for humans. For now, we'll have to be satisfied with observing it from afar - and with the advancements in space travel technology and camera technology, we've got pretty incredible photos to feast our eyes on. 

amazing photos of jupiter
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The Hubble Telescope's Best Images Ever Taken

First launched in 1990, the Hubble Telescope is coming up on its 30th anniversary in space. Having provided us with some of the most incredible images from our known universe, the Hubble has allowed us to explore parts of the universe no man-made craft could reach.

Roundup of the best images the Hubble Telescope has ever taken as it gets closer to 30 years in space
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The Hubble Telescope Gave Us an Incredible Look at Saturn's Rings and Moons

Amazing what a mere collection of water and ice and a few rocks can turn into. Saturn's rings are one of the most incredible sights in the night sky, and in space overall. Though their make up is unremarkable, since the 1970s when the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft visited the system and gave us our first close-up look. 

What's more amazing is that unlike many other celestial bodies in our universe, that we need to physically reach in order to get a clear picture of, Saturn is close enough that we can get images like those below.

The Hubble Space Telescope just gave us incredible views of Saturn's rings and the movement of its moons around it
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The galaxy in question looks a little fuzzy, but that's probably because it's so far away. A lot of the things we see from space are actually past versions of themselves because the light from the object took several years to get here. According to the video description, the light from this galaxy, blurry as it may be, took a very, very long time to get to the Hubble space telescope:

This animation shows the location of galaxy GN-z11, which is the farthest galaxy ever seen. The video begins by locating the Big Dipper, then showing the constellation Ursa Major. It then zooms into the GOODS North field of galaxies, and ends with a Hubble image of the young galaxy. GN-z11 is shown as it existed 13.4 billion years in the past, just 400 million years after the big bang, when the universe was only three percent of its present age.


This new development is record breaking and astronomers don't expect to beat it anytime soon until the launch of a new, larger observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope.


via NASA

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The Hubble website managed to explain what's happening in this picture while relating it all to Star Wars. 

In the center of the image, partially obscured by a dark, Jedi-like cloak of dust, a newborn star shoots twin jets out into space as a sort of birth announcement to the universe. Gas from a surrounding disk rains down onto the dust-obscured protostar and engorges it. The material is superheated and shoots outward from the star in opposite directions along an uncluttered escape route — the star's rotation axis.

Much more energetic than a science fiction lightsaber, these narrow energetic beams are blasting across space at over 100,000 miles per hour. This celestial lightsaber does not lie in a galaxy far, far away but rather inside our home galaxy, the Milky Way.



Apparently this process is all part of forming a new star. The Hubble website also includes a concept art that shows a clearer example of the beams of energy shooting out from the pancake of clouds and dust.