Time-Lapse Thing

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Time-Lapse Thing of the Day: Sam Klemke has been recording year-end video diaries for the past 35 years. This year he decided to stitch together, in reverse chronological order, clips from all 35 reflections.

Watch Sam go "from a paunchy middle aged white bearded self deprecating schluby old fart, to a svelt, full haired, clean shaven, self-important, inspired but clueless 20 year old." It's quite a sight to see.

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Time-Lapse Thing of the Day: A side-by-side synchronized comparison of the dark winter days and sunny summer nights in Helsinki, Finland.

[thanks anon!]

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Time-Lapse Thing of the Day: "24 Hours of Neon": Philip Bloom captures the "colour and insanity" of Las Vegas from a solitary view point: His hotel balcony.

BTS footage and process commentary here.

[doobybrain.]

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Time-Lapse Thing of the Day: "My goal was to show the duality between city and nature": Dominic Boudreault's "The City Limits" -- five locations; one year in the making.

[petapixel / laughingsquid.]

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Lights Out: Astrophotographer Daniel López films the skies above Tenerife, the largest of the Canary Islands.

[@thesquare.]

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Time-Lapse Thing of the Day: Stunning time-lapse sequence of magnet-manipulated ferrous printer toner particles floating on the surface of water.

Individual photos shot with a DIY macro lens and custom intervalometer attached to a Nikon D90.

Part of Kim Pimmel's ongoing series of "choreographed time-lapse shorts that explore

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Time-Lapse Thing of the Day: Nate Bolt recently traveled from San Francisco to Paris aboard an Air France flight, snapping nearly 2,500 photos along the way to stitch together into a two-minute time-lapse summary of his flight (which included a Northern Lights flyover).

As for the photos supposedly captured during takeoff and landing, Bolt assures viewers that they "are all computer models and totally rendered because I would neve