were-doomed

World Wildlife Fund study finds that the number of marine life in the ocean has halved since 1970.
  • -
  • Vote
  • -



There may no longer be plenty of fish in the sea.

A new study from the World Wildlife Fund arrived Sept. 16 to give you that particular sinking feeling that can only be found in the apocalyptic state towards which the world is slowly deteriorating.

The study, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, found that global marine life has declined by half, half, since 1970.

Analysis by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) of the population trends of marine species as presented in WWF's Living Blue Planet Report - an updated study of marine mammals, birds, reptiles and fish - shows a decline of 49 per cent in the size of marine populations between 1970 and 2012. As well as being disastrous for ecosystems, these findings spell trouble for all nations, especially people in the developing world who depend heavily on the ocean's resources.

The findings are based on the Living Planet Index, a database maintained and analysed by researchers at ZSL. Following alarming statistics raised in the Living Planet Report 2014, revealing huge declines in vertebrate populations around the world, this special report studies how overfishing, damage to habitat and climate change are affecting marine biodiversity.

The analysis tracked 5,829 populations of 1,234 species, from sea birds to sharks to leatherback turtles, making the data sets almost twice as large as past studies.



With fun subheadings like "Global food supply depleted" and "Devastating figures", the study credits climate change with causing the crazy decline.



Luckily, our national leaders are all firmly committed to reversing carbon emissions and slowing the steady pace of man-made climate change.

I've got to go lie down.