Via: Google
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Google wants to know—Light Side or Dark Side?

The company announced a new Star Wars-themed site today that will change your Google experience across platforms depending on if you choose light or dark side.

Your choice will change the look of everything from YouTube to Gmail and Google Maps.


Clay Bavor, VP of Product Management at Google explains the activation on the Google Official Blog:

It's a place for fans, by fans, and starting today you can choose the light or the dark side, and then watch your favorite Google apps like Gmail, Google Maps, YouTube, Chrome and many more transform to reflect your path. And that's just the beginning. We've got more coming between now and opening night—the Millennium Falcon in all its (virtual reality) glory included, so stay tuned. And we've hidden a few easter eggs, too. So awaken the Force within, and be on the lookout for things from a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…

So, what will it be?

The Dark Side or the Light?

Totally Necessary Invention of The Day: Domino's Creates an "Easy Order" Button For Your House
Via: Engadget
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Looking to shave a few seconds off your pizza order? Well, you're in luck.

Domino's is testing out a new "Easy Order" button in the UK. And if you're really, really into pizza—this might do the trick for you.

From Engadget:

The Easy Order actually comes in two forms: a physical and a virtual button. The physical option is provided by Flic and is a tiny magnetic button that can be programmed to do a number of different things. We've seen it used to control various phone functions, like snoozing an alarm or taking a photo, in the past, but Domino's will pair it with an app over Bluetooth in order for it to become your pizza delivery companion. Simply save your address and payment details on the Domino's website or app and select your favourite order -- the rest takes care of itself.

We're one useless invention away from Smart House.

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Baseball player Bryce Harper was just named National League MVP last week. He also let the entire world know he doesn't want to be a meme.

The trouble with that is he pronounced meme like "meh-may" and thus was turned into a meme.

An interview with Scott Van Pelt on SportsCenter is where the MVP was where the gaf happened.

And a new meh-may was born...

Welcome to the Internet, Bryce.

We are a cruel people.

Fail of The Day: The Hottest New Toy Will Wreck Your Kid's Hair
Via: Amazon
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If you want your kid to hate you forever, this is what you should get them for Christmas.

Bunchems, this year's trendy toy for kids, is causing some major problems for children with long hair. Mainly, the tiny pieces used to create 3D artwork are ripping out all of their luscious locks.

The toy is supposed to make things like this...

But parents on Amazon are saying the pieces of the toy are a nightmare if caught in hair.

The Bunchems website does have a video tutorial on how to get them out of hair, and there are warnings on the box. it really worth it?

We'll stick with Gak.

Via: Ubermass
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Mark Cuban is so chill, you guys.

The billionaire was taking part in a League of Legends show match at the Intel Extreme Masters San Jose on Saturday when he started trash talking the other team.

During an interview (about 1 minute in the video above) he dropped an f-bomb and was informed he would have to pay $15,000, which was OK because it would go to charity.

But then he did it again.

"So if I say it again I have to pay another $15,000?"

You da man, Mark Cuban!

Study of The Day: Pew Research Shows 40 Percent of Millennials Would Censor Offensive Speech
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America: Land of the free and home of censorship?

A new study by Pew Research shows that American Millennials are far more likely to support the government banning offensive speech about minority groups than other generations.

Of those aged 18-34, 40 percent support censoring offensive speech.

"We asked whether people believe that citizens should be able to make public statements that are offensive to minority groups, or whether the government should be able to prevent people from saying these things. Four-in-ten Millennials say the government should be able to prevent people publicly making statements that are offensive to minority groups, while 58% said such speech is OK."

Although this statistic might be shocking to some free speech advocates, it really should be taken with a large grain of salt.

Nearly two-thirds of Americans still say "offensive speech" should be allowed. And out of 38 other nations polled, the median was 35 percent.

There's also a difference in education levels and support for limiting speech. Those with a high school degree or less are 9-percentage-points more likely to support censorship.

You can draw your own conclusions with that last statistic.

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