Hidekichi Miyazaki breaks the world record for the 100-Meter Dash.
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A Japanese man believes he can improve his time, even though he just received the Guinness World Record for fastest 100-meter dash by a person over 105 years old.

The Japan Times has the story:

Hidekichi Miyazaki, dubbed "Golden Bolt" after the fastest man on the planet, clocked 42.22 seconds in Kyoto to set a world record in the 100-meter dash for the over-105 age category — which had been nonexistent — a day after his birthday.

"I'm not happy with the time," the pint-size Miyazaki said in an interview after catching his wind. "I started shedding tears during the race because I was going so slowly. Perhaps I'm getting old!"

Indeed, so leisurely was his pace that Bolt could have run his world record of 9.58 seconds four times, or practically completed a 400-meter race — a fact not lost on Miyazaki.

...Asked about Bolt's latest heroics at the IAAF World Championships last month in Beijing, Miyazaki screwed up his nose and said with a chuckle: "He hasn't raced me yet!"

The twinkle-toed Miyazaki, who holds the 100-meter record for centenarians at 29.83 seconds, insisted there was still time for a dream race against the giant Jamaican.

Miyazaki said he thought he could get his time down to 35 seconds and we believe him.

Keep going!

Japan's Mount Aso had a surprise eruption.
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A few unlucky hikers were caught in one hell of a big surprise as the volcanon on which they were traveled erupted suddenly, Sept. 14.

Thankfully, no injuries were reported from enormous burst of black smoke and ash that rose up to 1.2 miles in the air.

According to The Guardian:

The 1,592-metre (5,222ft) high Mount Aso is one of the most active peaks in Japan but also a popular hiking spot. There were a handful of people at a parking lot near the peak but they were being evacuated safely, officials said on Monday. They said the eruption had come without warning.

The Guardian was also kind enough to provide a handy map so you know where this happened:

Here's a video of dat ash:

There is a nearby nuclear plant, but officials have said that it remains unaffected by the surprise eruption.

WTF of The Day: A Japanese Adult Film Actress Will Appear on Metro Cards in Taiwan
Via: Slate
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Things are about to get a whole lot hotter on Taiwanese public transportation, and not because of the summer heat.

Japanese adult film star Yui Hatano will appear on metro cards in Taiwan with "angel" and "devil" themes, reports BBC.

Here's an SFW version of the angel card.

And for those feeling a little naughty, the devil card.

Disney Japan Twitter doesn't get national tragedies.
Via: Kotaku
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Either Disney Japan's Twitter has a pretty cruel sense of humor or some ignorant employees.

On Aug. 9, the official Japanese Twitter account for Disney tweeted out the following message to its 277,000 followers:

According to Kotaku the Japanese at the top reads "Congrats on a trifling day" before the Alice in Wonderland message.

Well, you see, Aug. 9 was also the 70th anniversary of the World War II atomic bombing of Nagasaki. In that event, according to Wikipedia, "roughly 39,000–80,000 people were killed. About half of these died immediately, while the other half suffered lingering deaths."

Not exactly a "trifling day" for the country who marked the occasion with solemn ceremonies, commemorating all of those 'unbirthdays'.

Kotaku, through translating Japanese news site My Game News Flash, points out that this isn't the only time the Twitter account has made a less-than-sensitive post.

The account posted this, reading "Enjoying your summer vacation?" last year on Aug. 15.

Aug. 15 marks the date of the Japanese surrender in World War II.

Additionally, the account posted this, reading "Giving you mid-summer sympathy" on Aug. 6.

Aug. 6 is the anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing, in which some 70,000-80,000 people died.

As Kotaku says:

My Game News points out that Disney Japan's Twitter account typically does not post messages like this (instead, the tweets are typically PR, introducing movies, TV shows, events or products), making these questionable tweets stand out even more. Why were these dates selected, people wondered.

Disney Japan has since apologized for the tweet and deleted it off of its account.

That's why you always get a screen shot.

North Korea f*cks with Japan by setting its clocks back half an hour.
Via: AP
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All right, stop. Pyongyang time.

The Associate Press is reporting that North Korea has decided to set up its own time zone. The official time, as announced by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), will be half an hour earlier than it currently is and it appears that the reason for this change is just to mess with Japan.

The new time zone will take effect Aug. 15 — the 70th anniversary of Korea's liberation from Japanese rule at the end of World War II, North Korea's official Central News Agency said Friday. The establishment of "Pyongyang time" will root out that legacy, it said.

Local time in North and South Korea and Japan is the same — nine hours ahead of GMT. It was set during Japan's rule over what was single Korea from 1910 to 1945.

"The wicked Japanese imperialists committed such unpardonable crimes as depriving Korea of even its standard time while mercilessly trampling down its land with 5,000-year-long history and culture and pursuing the unheard-of policy of obliterating the Korean nation," the KCNA dispatch said.

You can watch a video of the announcement on The Guardian's website.

North Korean officials named the new time "Pyongyang time" and probably has nothing to do with M.C. Hammer's catch phrase.

It was awfully nice of both North Korea and Russia to give us examples today of what weird countries they are.

Ancient bonsai tree survived the atomic bomb in Japan.
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When America dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945, a great many things were destroyed in the devastating blast but some survived it to this day.

Marking the 70th anniversary of the bombing Aug. 6, the United States government will also honor the survival of a white pine bonsai tree that managed to live through it.

Housed in the National Arboretum in Northeast Washington D.C., no one guessed about the tree's significance until 2001.

The tree, donated by a bonsai master named Masaru Yamaki, was part of a 53-specimen gift to the United States for its 1976 bicentennial. Little was known about the tree until March 8, 2001, when — with no advance notice — two brothers visiting from Japan showed up at the museum to check on their grandfather's tree.

Ensuring the continued survival of such an important piece of the collection is no easy task. It falls to Jack Sustic, who has been the curator of the Bonsai and Penjing Museum since 2002.

Bonsai, Sustic said, refers not to the type of tree but rather the manner in which it is cared for. It is the blending of nature and art, he said.

On Aug. 6, 1945, a 9,700-pound bomb exploded over the city at 8:15 a.m. A walled nursery belonging to the Yamakis was less than two miles from the site of the bomb blast, but the ancient tree, Sustic said, was just far enough away to survive.

"Location, location, location," Sustic said. "It was up against a wall. It must have been the wall that shielded it from the blast."

Keep going little tree. In the words of Dr. Ian Malcom:

Japanese Sea Slugs are adorable.
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We all know Japanese culture appreciates some cute things and it's found another one in a sea slug.

The jorunna parva, or adorable bunny slug of the sea, has been making the rounds of Japanese social media and setting a new standard for cuteness in slugs.

We admit, it's not a very high bar.

Just look at them:

Oh, and they are also absolutely tiny, growing to a maximum of 21 millimeters.

As we say, the lovely little things have been crawling their way across the international Twittersphere. Unfortunately, we don't read Japanese, but we can assume these admirers are big fans of the bunny slugs.

Go ahead and watch the adorable things in action.

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