Japan

japanese bathrooms adding smartphone wipes
Via: Toru Hanai/Reuters
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Japan might be about 14 hours ahead of New York, but sometimes it feels like the whole country is light years ahead of the world.

Bathrooms at Tokyo Narita International Airport now come equipped with wipes for your smartphone because those things are disgusting and, man, you need to clean it. Why are we just doing this now?

via Carly Googles

The company that installed them, NTT Docomo, Japan’s largest telecommunications company, said the wipes will be available until March 15, at which point you’ll be forced to clean your phone on your own time and hopefully not get sick. After all, “cell phones carry 10 times more bacteria than most toilet seats” — a man in Uganda even contracted Ebola after stealing one, according to Live Science.

NTT Docomo also provided a handy how-to video for using Japanese toilets and information about the wipes, which also include helpful information, like WiFi passwords. Sanitary, informative, and efficient, these wipes are what 2017 are all about. 



via Toru Sanitary/Reuters

So remember, if someone asks how often you should clean your phone, respond “as often as possible” because you now have no excuse.

via docomoOfficial

H/T Huffington Post

Via: 温泉ハイスタンダード! 極楽地獄別府
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tfac

When you go to an amusement part, and you’re surrounded by thousands of sweaty strangers, what do you want? Turkey leg? Dippin’ dots? The opportunity to see those sweaty strangers half-naked and wrapped in towel.

If you answered number three. congratulations, you’ve won the opportunity to buy a ticket to Beppu City’s “Spamusement Park.”

Beppu City, Japan is home to numerous hot springs, gushing out over 130,000 tons from the ground a year. “It’s the second largest amount of water discharge in the world, and the largest in Japan,” according to Wikipedia. And now they’re looking to one up themselves.

via Reddit

No, not a spa for dogs, unfortunately. According to this video, Beppu City will construct an amusement park in the city, which combines the sweaty mess of the spa with the sweaty mess of the amusement park. As Beppu City Mayor Yasuhiro Nagano, if this video reaches 1 million views, they will begin the spamusment park initiative. The video now has over 2 million.

Imagine it: A roller coaster where you sit in a hot tub of water; a tea cups ride where you actually sit in a hot cup of water; a ferris wheel where you sit in a hot tub of water. Your steam dreams are about to come true.

japanese ice skating rink filled with dead fish closed after complaints
Via: @cctvnews
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Looks like that box of fish sticks in the back of your freezer is going to stay there.

Space World, a Japanese theme park, shutdown their ice skating rink attraction on Sunday, because as it turns out, most people don’t consider skating around dead fish to be a winter wonderland. The theme park froze 5,000 sea creatures into the floor of their skating rink, thinking that attendees would enjoy the challenge of navigating an ocean graveyard. Space World called it “Freezing Port.” We call it “A Nightmare.” 

Freezing Port received a slew of complaints from visitors and animal rights organizations. One Facebook user said, “You have no soul.” While another simply, and more practically, said, “This is the worst attraction educationally.” Apparently, only a select few found Space World's Facebook advertisements with captions that read “I am d... d... drowning, s ... s... suffocating” funny and not horrifying.

“We were shocked to hear the reaction as the ice skate rink was very popular since it opened two weeks ago,” Space World manager Toshimi Takeda told to CNN. “We had an unprecedented number of visitors.”

“We are sorry for the project and decided to close the rink.”

CNN added the park will “unfreeze the skate rink to remove the fish, hold an ‘appropriate religious service,’ and then reuse them as fertilizer.” Cool.

So there you have it. Theme park buys locally-sourced seafood, freezes it into their skating rink, and holds memorial service for the fish after learned that people don’t like ice skating on dead fish. Welcome to Monday morning on Planet Earth.

via GIPHY

parenting news forest After Six Days Lost in a Forest, a Missing Japanese Boy Has Been Found Alive
Via: BBC News
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Almost a week ago, Seven-year-old Yamato Tanooka was left on the side of the road near a "bear-infested" forest in Hokkaido, Japan. The search began after the missing boy dissapeared into the forest, thinking his parents had left him for good as punishment for throwing rocks at cars and visitors at a nearby park.  Miraculously, this little boy was found ALIVE and relatively unharmed after six nights alone in the forest. 


via white-couple

Yamato managed to survive in the forest for so long after stumbling upon a hut used during training for the Japanese military. He did not have any food or heating but he did manage to keep warm by sleeping between two mattresses.  He also had access to clean water nearby.  For now, he's being kept for observation under a doctors orders but seems to be doing fine. This event has sparked debate over where normal parental punishment can cross the line into abuse with most people on social media condemning his parents for leaving him. 

Via: Joseph Tame
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The Running Christmas Tree is the latest revolutionary wearable device to have been developed by Tokyo-based inventor Joseph Tame.

This mobile seasonal illumination device has been designed to disrupt the illumination industry by allowing for on-demand illumination - simply pull out your phone and summon the Christmas tree anytime, anywhere, and Joseph will head in your direction to bring some light into your life.

Featuring over 1500 LEDs, 9 mico-controlers and 100 batteries, this 25kg / 2.5metre tree is unlike anything seen before, and has been a huge hit on the streets of Tokyo where the service was first rolled out.

Full information on the tree and links to book it for yourself can be found a: http://tokyoxmas.org



Fast Food of The Day: McDonald's in Japan Will Sell a 48-Piece Chicken Nugget Meal
Via: Kotaku
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48 chicken nuggets, 2,256 calories, no regrets.

McDonald's in Japan is planning on offering a 48-piece chicken nugget meal. The United States currently offers a 40-piece, so maybe this doesn't seem like a big deal.

But it is. Because the largest current chicken nugget meal in Japan is a 15-piece.

From Kotaku:

Likewise, the offer is for a limited time only. It's available only in Niigata Prefecture and part of a promotional tie-up with the the newly launched pop group NGT48, the Niigata-based spin-off of the massively popular idol unit AKB48. The groups tend to have around 48 members (sometimes more, sometimes less), divided up into different teams. That's a lot of idols. That's okay, this is a lot of nuggets. Forty-eight nuggets is surely a whole chicken, no? Fifty has to be.

King Curtis is very happy with this decision.

History of The Day: Rare Photo of 'The World's Most Loyal Dog' Emerge
Via: The Japan News
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A rare photo of Hachiko, the Japanese Akita dog know as the "World's Most Loyal Dog," has emerged 80 years after his death.

The story of Hachiko and his owner Uneo dates back to 1920's Tokyo, where it is said Hachiko would wait every day at the train station for Uneo to arrive back home from work.

This happened every day, until 1925 when Uneo unexpectedly died while at work.

Hachiko couldn't understand that his owner had died, so he stood watch at the train station for 10 years until his death in 1935.

Most photos of Hachiko (like the one above) only show him standing alone, but the new photo shows his surroundings.

The photo shows the dog blending in naturally at the station, and is totally different from other memorial and closeup photos.

When Hachiko is pictured alone, the environment around the dog is unclear. Almost all shots of the dog with people were taken as memorial photos.

The photo found recently was taken around 1934 by the late Isamu Yamamoto, a former bank employee who lived in the Sarugakucho district in Shibuya Ward, Tokyo. That year, the first statue of the dog was erected in front of the station and Hachiko attracted public attention as a faithful dog.

Hachiko is a true icon, receiving tributes and statues across Japan.

Good boy, Hachiko. Good boy.

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