Here is Derek Jeter's Final At-Bat, a Walk-Off Single in the Bottom of the 9th

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A fitting end to the illustrious career of a baseball icon. Even as a die-hard Red Sox fan, you may hate Jeter's guts. But dammit, you've still got to respect him.

Frivolous Lawsuit of the Day: Yankees Fan Caught Sleeping at a Game is Suing ESPN, MLB for $10 MIllion

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A fan caught on camera sleeping during a New York Yankees-Boston Red Sox game in April has filed a defamation lawsuit against Major League Baseball, the Yankees, ESPN and the game's two announcers (John Kruk and Dan Shulman),according to The Courthouse News Service.

Andrew Robert Rector, in a lawsuit filed in Bronx Supreme Court, lays out why he felt he was defamed after images of him nodding off at Yankee Stadium on April 13 were broadcast.

"In the course of watching the game plaintiff napped and this opened unending verbal crusade against the napping plaintiff," the complaint stated.

Batkid Threw Out the Ceremonial First Pitch at the San Francisco Giants Home Opener

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There are a lot of good first pitches out there, but this one has to be the most heartwarming.

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Fraud of the Day

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Fraud of the Day
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Major League Baseball All-Star Game MVP Melky Cabrera is the most recent recipient of a 50-game ban handed down by the league office, after testing positive for testosterone -- a no-no under the league's performance enhancing drug policy. Normally that's where the story ends, barring appeals. However, the New York Daily News has discovered a bizarre plot -- one that would make Albert Belle's Cleveland Indians proud.

Melky and his "associates" concocted a website which sold a fake product containing a banned substance, which Cabrera unknowingly purchased and used. Cabrera presented this as evidence at his appeal hearing, and probably thought he was home free. That is, until some very obvious subjects were addressed:

MLB's department of investigations quickly began asking questions about the website and the "product" — Where was the site operating from? Who owned it? What kind of product was it? — and quickly discovered that an existing website had been altered, adding an ad for the product, a topical cream, that didn't exist.

The comedy of errors now involves the FDA, an investigation into Cabrera's "associates", and (what we can all assume) an unlikely repealing of the suspension.

[deadspin]