bully

Bully who punched a blind kid gets some justice of his own from the hero that stepped in to stop him.
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We talked about this stand up teen who knocked down a bully picking on a blind kid yesterday and it looks like further justice has been served.

The authorities and social media have gotten involved.

New York Daily News put together a comprehensive story about the fight:

A California high school bully who was thrown to the ground after beating up a partially blind student was arrested Thursday, police said as the teen who stopped the assault spoke out for the first time.

The teen tormenter, Noah, was arrested for misdemeanor battery and released to his parents after a video of him hitting his visually impaired peer, Austin, at Huntington Beach High School circulated on social media, police said.

[Cody Pines, the teen who stopped the bully] was hailed a hero online and by his peers for his actions, although Pines said he "didn't really want to hit him" in his first interview Thursday.

"But when you punch a blind kid, that's what made me so mad," Pines told FOX LA. "I kinda regretted it but I kinda didn't because if I didn't Austin would've been more hurt."

Pines, a former football player, said he had seen other videos of bullies "beating up kids and getting away with it" and told himself he would never let that happen if he witnessed it.

Teresa White said she is "proud of our grandson for standing up for that young man."


Here's the video if you haven't seen it yet:

bully,rating
By Unknown
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After a drawn-out battle with the MPAA, a toned-down re-submission of The Weinstein Company documentary Bully has earned a PG-13 rating.

A crucial scene in the film that centers on main subject Alex Libby -- in which there are three uses of the word f**k as he is harassed on a bus -- will stay put.

"The scene that mattered remains untouched and intact, which is a true sign that we have won this battle," said director Lee Hirsch.

[hollywoodreporter]

AMC theaters,bully,MPAA,Photo,ratings,The Weinstein Company
By Unknown
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The Weinstein Company has scored a couple of victories in the ratings battle over Bully, striking a deal with AMC Theaters to allow moviegoers under the age of 17 to see the bullying documentary despite Weinstein's decision to release the movie without an MPAA rating.

Unrated movies are typically treated as NC-17 -- no minors allowed, even with parental permission -- by the MPAA and theater owners, but AMC has made an exception for Bully, letting kids 17 or under into the movie with a parent or a signed permission slip.

Meanwhile, independent movie rating group Common Sense Media has issued a "13+" rating for Bully, the same rating it gave The Hunger Games.

The Weinstein Company has decided to use that rating, instead of the MPAA's proposed "R" (for strong language), on Bully's promotional poster, marking the first time a CSM rating has been used by a studio to promote a film.

[ew.]

bully,infographic,MPAA
By Unknown
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Of course the MPAA doesn't want people to see Bully. If people stopped turning a blind eye to bullying it would no longer exist.

[thanks jill!]

By johnnyi
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Another Follow Up of the Day: The National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO) has sided with the MPAA in its decision to reject The Weinstein Company’s request to lower the rating of the film studio's bullying documentary from an R to a PG-13 so it could be used as an educational aid.

Bully rece

By Unknown
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Bully of the Day: The MPAA today rejected the Weinstein Company's request to reduce the rating of their bullying documentary from an R to a PG-13.

The rating, given for language, was reportedly upheld by a single vote.

Harvey Weinstein had hoped Bully could be used as an educational

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