Rewrite of the Day: The Internet Reboots Sexist Book That Says Engineer Barbie Can't Code

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Rewrite of the Day: The Internet Reboots Sexist Book That Says Engineer Barbie Can't Code
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The book "Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer" sounds promising from the title, but as many have discovered, the plot turns out to be a misogynistic disaster.

In the story (which was released in 2013), Barbie is designing a video game (yay!), but instead of doing the coding herself, she requires the help of two men (boo!). Because try as she might, it takes more than a silly girl with a heart-shaped flash drive necklace to do the heavy lifting, according to the children's story.

After infecting everyone's computers with a virus, and begging for help from her friends Steven and Brian, Barbie ends up taking all the credit for her completed game.

As a result of this discovery, the Internet has decided to re-write the book.

On the site "Feminist Hacker Barbie," users can submit their own take on the story, to "help Barbie be the competent, independent, bad-ass engineer that she wants to be."



Casey Fiesler, a PhD student at Georgia Tech, has also remixed her own version of the story.



Her main issue with the book:

The problem isn't even that Barbie isn't a 'real' computer scientist because she isn't coding. (I am one of those mostly-non-coding computer scientists myself, though now I'm tempted to make a game about robot puppies shooting lasers anyway.) The problem is the assumption that she is a designer, not a coder, and the coders are boys.

Maybe the new "normal Barbie" Lammily will be more successful at an engineering career.

Cringe of the Day: The One Surefire Way to Learn Code

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I want to believe this is a joke... but it isn't.

Encryption of the Day: The Internet Helps Solve a Mystery Code From a Dying Woman

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Encryption of the Day: The Internet Helps Solve a Mystery Code From a Dying Woman
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A cancer-ridden women who died decades ago left a series of index cards with indeciphierable ramblings on the backs of them to her grandchildren before her passing. Now fully grown, those grandchildren have turned to the internet in hopes that they can get help in solving what they beiieve is some form of code.

My grandmother passed away in 1996 of a fast-spreading cancer. She was non-communicative her last two weeks, but in that time, she left at least 20 index cards with scribbled letters on them. My cousins and I were between 8-10 years old at the time, and believed she was leaving us a code. We puzzled over them for a few months trying substitution ciphers, and didn't get anywhere.

After making the post on Metafilter, parts of the encryption seemed to have been already solved. It appeared to users that the woman was partly writing prayers through her code.

Was she a religious woman? The last As, as well as the AAA combo, make me think of "Amen, amen, amen." So extrapolating -- TYAGF = "Thank you Almighty God for..."

It would make sense to end with "Thank you, Almighty God, for everything, Amen - Thank you, Almighty God, for everything, Amen, Amen, Amen."

OFWAIHHBTNTKCTWBDOEAIIIHFUTDODBAFUOT
AWFTWTAUALUNITBDUFEFTITKTPATGFAEA

Our Father who art in Heaven, hallowed be thy name... etc etc etc

Check out the entire thread here to see if you can figure it out!