google search

Fyrkantig, Sparsam, Dagstorp, Grundtal. Unless you speak Swedish, these words can only mean one thing: Ikea.

But no more. Ikea, who for years has named their comfortable, affordable, and dorm room-ready furniture by following a pretty strict system, is now in the trolling business, and business is good.

Last night, for reasons unknown, so for now we’ll just assume that they thought it would be funny, Ikea replaced the names of their products with common Google searches. So suddenly a thing like Lattjo becomes “My Family Doesn’t Respect Me” and Memnes becomes “My Friend Only Talks About Himself.”

via Vimeo

This is all apart of “Ikea's Retail Therapy.” Through this site, Ikea doesn’t just furnish your apartment with practical and fashionable Swedish goods, but also fixes your life — or, at least, gives you something to buy, so you can forget about your actual problems. Check it out.

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Google is making the first major update to the company's logo in 16 years. But the reason is pretty simple.

"Today we're introducing a new logo and identity family that reflects this reality and shows you when the Google magic is working for you, even on the tiniest screens," Google says in a blog post announcing the change.

The company says the original logo and branding were created for a single desktop browser page, and as we all know, mobile is the #future.

The logo will also be interactive.

"For example, new elements like a colorful Google mic help you identify and interact with Google whether you're talking, tapping or typing. Meanwhile, we're bidding adieu to the little blue "g" icon and replacing it with a four-color "G" that matches the logo."

Sound good, Google. Now what is that song that goes "dun, dun, dun dun dun?"

google search,controversy,Casey Anthony
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Casey Anthony's murder trial is back in the news circuit again after an Orlando-based news station reported that detectives had overlooked a Google search for "foolproof suffocation" that was likely made by the now acquitted suspect and the mother of the victim. According to WKMG, the search query took place on the day of Caylee's disappearance, specifically an hour after her grandfather George had left the house for work, leaving the 26-year-old mother as the likely suspect behind the Google search. Even during the trial in 2011, the prosecutors' put forth several suspicious Google search terms that may have been input by Casey Anthony, including "how to make chloroform," "chest trauma," and "neck breaking."

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