This Is All Kinds Of Wrong of the Day

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This Is All Kinds Of Wrong of the Day
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The U.K.'s High Court has ruled that Tony Nicklinson, the U.K. man with locked-in syndrome who says his life is "dull, miserable, demeaning, undignified, and intolerable," does not have the right to die.

The court blatantly ignored Oregon's Death with Dignity Act in its ruling, saying that there was no precedent for assisted dying anywhere in the world:

It is not for the court to decide whether the law on assisted dying should be changed and, if so, what safeguards should be put in place. Under our system of government these are matters for Parliament to decide... not for the court on the facts of an individual case or cases.

Nicklinson, "devastated," likely will appeal to the Supreme Court:

I thought that if the court saw me as I am, utterly miserable with my life, powerless to do anything about it because of my disability then the judges would accept my reasoning that I do not want to carry on and should be able to have a dignified death. ...

Judges, like politicians, are happiest when they can avoid confronting the real issues and this judgment is not an exception to this rule… this means yet another period of physical discomfort, misery and mental anguish while we find out who controls my life -- me or the state.

[theindependent]

Heartwarming Tearjerker of the Day

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Heartwarming Tearjerker of the Day
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Mark Ellis suffered a stroke at the age of 22, and subsequently developed locked-in syndrome -- he was completely paralyzed and unable to speak, but his mind was unharmed.

But just weeks earlier, his wife Amy had given birth to their daughter Lola-Rose. Despite being given a slim chance of survival, Amy Ellis says her husband eventually regained the ability to talk, move, and walk by mimicking his infant daughter:

He started to make the same sounds, and then the words came too. There wasn't much time between him and Lola-Rose both taking their first steps -- I think Mark took his first steps a week or two after Lola. They use toys, books, games and the iPad together to learn how to do things and communicate. Doctors didn't expect him to survive but his youth and mental strength have helped him pull through.

Amy Ellis says that despite her husband's recovery, they support the family of Tony Nicklinson, who has suffered from locked-in syndrome for seven years and last week took his fight for the right to die to court.

[theweek]

Heartbreaking Tearjerker of the Day

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Tony Nicklinson suffered a massive stroke in 2005 that left him with locked-in syndrome -- he is completely paralyzed and unable to speak, but his mind was unharmed.

Now, the 57-year-old has become the first person to tweet using only the movement of his eyes:

Hello world, I am tony nicklinson, I have locked-in syndrome and this is my first ever tweet.

Nicklinson, who lives in the U.K., will ask the high court Monday to argue that a doctor should be allowed lawfully to end his life. He says his current state is "dull, miserable, demeaning, undignified and intolerable."

Follow him @TonyNicklinson. (Loving husband and father. Rugby fan. Twitter novice with locked-in syndrome.)

[gizmodo]