robot

This vomiting robot is supposed to help scientists study disease.
Via: sciencemag
  • -
  • Vote
  • -



As scientists develop robots with more and more recognizably human traits, you still probably wouldn't expect one to puke.

Researchers at the North Carolina State University actually found a reason to build one that mimics human retching. They wanted to specifically see how the norovirus is spread.

As Science Magazine writes:

Previous anecdotal evidence has suggested that virus particles—specifically norovirus, the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in the United States—might go airborne in the process of puking. But according to food virologist Lee-Ann Jaykus of North Carolina State University in Raleigh, "nobody had ever proven in a lab model that the virus can be aerosolized by vomiting."

To rectify that, Jaykus and her team built a miniature "vomiting machine," a quarter-scale model of the human digestive system complete with an artificial stomach, esophagus, and mouth. They designed it to mimic all the pressures and volumes present in hurling humans and then inoculated its "stomach" juices with a virus called MS2 (which is similar to the size, shape, and composition of norovirus but not dangerous to humans).



There's a whole video explaining the machine and its uses, but this is the only thing that you probably want to see:



Here's the whole video if you're just a stickler for knowing all you can about your vomiting robots.



As Vox helpfully points out, this is far from the first gross machine that science has built.

British scientists built 'Vomiting Larry' to study projectile vomiting.



Then there is the 'Cloaca machine', which is a replication of the human digestion system. It actually makes feces.

AKA Poo Bot.

  • -
  • Vote
  • -



Boston Dynamics scares us again.

The Google-owned company that brought you the big dog robot, which you totally remember as that crazy thing that doesn't fall over when it slips on ice, is back at it again giving us a clearer view of what a possible robot takeover would look like.

They showed some footage of a humanoid robot treading its way through various terrain, including going for a leisurely stroll in the woods.

It doesn't have a head or much in the way of arms, but it does have the capacity to make you feel weird.



In the video, as in everything else they produce, they claim the robots could be used for transportation support through rougher environments, but we can imagine many, many other uses for that future terminator.

My personal favorite of these freaky videos is the time they made the big dog into a cheetah, topping out 28 miles per hour.



  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Remember that sweet remote-controlled, life-size prototype of WALL-E from last year? Robot enthusiast Mike McMaster invites you to his workshop for a test drive and an explanation of how his team re-created Pixar's iconic robot character.

Via: Engadget
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Japan's robotics research collective Bravo Robotics unveiled a preview of its latest prototype model for a remote-controlled sports car that transforms into a bipedal robot, which will be presented during the upcoming Maker Faire in Tokyo. The 1/12 scale model is operated by a modified PS3 controller and comes equipped with a missile launcher on each arm and a wireless camera that feeds into mobile devices like iPad.



Shut Up and Take My Money of the Day is a feature series dedicated to highlighting the latest innovations and visions in the world of consumer product design and gadgetry.

Via: Reddit
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Hotlanta's famous Marquese Scott (a.k.a Nonstop) and other members of the DragonHouse dance crew bring out some incredible robotic moves for a test run in bullet time, set to the track "Illusion of Choice" by Gramatik.

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Japanese gizmo maker Takara Tomy Arts unveils its line of batterly-run, lifelike Robofish toys (¥2,980 / $37 per fish) at the 2012 Tokyo Toy Fair.



Shut Up and Take My Money of the Day is a feature series dedicated to highlighting the latest innovations and visions in the world of consumer product design and gadgetry.

By Unknown
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Skippy, the stone-skipping robot, is really good at skipping stones. He's probably better than you. Skippy scoffs at your lazy days by the lake, biding your time until summer's end.

Thanks to the internet, you can control Skippy in real time (in the daylight) and watch him slowly fill an Idaho pond, one rock at a time. This is a limited engagement that ends on July 13.

[geekologie]

Back to Top