science

Via: Add World
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Possible spoilers ahead? 

The people who created this used a "machine learning algorithm" to figure out who is most likely to die next. They go into a much deeper explanation about their initial data gathering from the books and how they use those factors to predict who's next on the website.

They've also got a ranking system to show you who you can expect to die, although these seem to be based on what the books have revealed so far so we may find out if these predictions come true when season six begins. 

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

This is a step in the right direction toward self-driving trucks. This is part of the European Truck Platooning Challenge where trucks follow each other, connected by Wifi, to get to their destination. Unlike with human drivers, these trucks can stay much closer to each other on the road and it actually saves a lot of money in gas. 

You'll practically feel yourself absorb the knowledge packed in these neat science gifs! Okay... most of them are just cool science tricks but they might inspire you to learn more, right?

education,gifs,list,science
View List
  • -
  • Vote
  • -
unicorn science fossils Unicorns Were Real, and They Lived in Kazakhstan
Via: USNews
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Fossils of a prehistoric creature called the Siberian Unicorn, or Elasmotherium sibiricum, have been found in the Pavlodar region of Kazakhstan.  Most depictions of this animal show it looking kind of like a cross between a rhinoceros and a donkey rather than a noble horse. 


via Heinrich Harder via copyrightexpired

Though the Siberian Unicorn is decidedly less majestic than you might expect, this find is still pretty big news. Scientists thought that the species died out at least 350,000 years ago but that's not the case.  These new fossils place it at around 29,000 years ago according to a study published in the American Journal of Applied Sciences.

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

The idea for a spoon you can eat originated in Hyderabad, India with the inventor, Narayana Peesapaty.  It's a pretty sturdy spoon with just a few ingredients that he hopes will be able to compete with disposable plastic spoons.  

Originally only available in India, it looks like this spoon might be coming to American markets. 


via @NarayanaPeesapa

If you're wondering how it can stand up to hot liquids and still biodegrade a few days later the answer is that the water does have some affect on it.  A dry spoon in an airtight container will stay good for up to two years but, according to the FAQ on the Bakey's website, if you leave it in liquid for over 10 minutes it will get soggy.

Via: Vox
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

You've probably learned about vestigial organs in Biology class by now. There are a lot of things that aren't important to humans any more but we've still held onto them in some way. If you've ever seen someone wiggle their ears, it's obvious. 

This video shows some of those unnecessary parts and why we used to have them. It also goes into detail about the way that some humans have actually lost those extra pieces. 



That's evolution at work. 

science biology neil degrasse tyson Neil DeGrasse Tyson Reminds Everyone He Is Not a Biologist With One Very Inaccurate Tweet
Via: neiltyson
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Neil DeGrasse Tyson made a lot of people (and presumably ducks, cats and bedbugs) angry with a much less than true fact about sex and evolution.  His claim, that sex doesn't hurt any species had many Twitter users jumping to correct him. 


via @RachelFeltman, @SciPhile, @ClaireConnelly, @carlzimmer@DreadMorgan

And you might be thinking, he's just trying to be positive about human sexuality and say, in his own pseudoscientific way that it's healthy and painless for humans. But... that's actually not true either:


via @DebbyHerbenick@mikamckinnon

Sure, he's a scientist but cut him some slack, he's not that kind of scientist. He studied astrophysics, how's he supposed to check his facts at all before Tweeting about biology?


via my-little-talks

Back to Top