science

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The galaxy in question looks a little fuzzy, but that's probably because it's so far away. A lot of the things we see from space are actually past versions of themselves because the light from the object took several years to get here. According to the video description, the light from this galaxy, blurry as it may be, took a very, very long time to get to the Hubble space telescope:

This animation shows the location of galaxy GN-z11, which is the farthest galaxy ever seen. The video begins by locating the Big Dipper, then showing the constellation Ursa Major. It then zooms into the GOODS North field of galaxies, and ends with a Hubble image of the young galaxy. GN-z11 is shown as it existed 13.4 billion years in the past, just 400 million years after the big bang, when the universe was only three percent of its present age.


This new development is record breaking and astronomers don't expect to beat it anytime soon until the launch of a new, larger observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope.


via NASA

Astronaut Scott Kelly was brought safely home last night after spending nearly a year in space. He was primarily in space to study himself to learn about how human bodies change in space. He even has an identical twin who stayed back on Earth to compare results. But what else was he doing for so long up on the International Space Station? He actually kept a pretty good record on Twitter.

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science fossils image Scientists Found a 520 Million-Year-Old Fossil With an Incredibly Well Preserved Nervous System
Via: Mashable
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The fossil of an ancient shrimp-like crustacean has been discovered with possibly the most well-preserved nervous system ever found.  It's called a Chengjiangocaris kunmingensis and it lived 520 million years ago.  This specimen doesn't only show large nerve clusters as pictured. Some of the finest fibers of nerve tissue are also observable under a microscope. 

via Vice

Scientists are hoping that this fossil will give new insight into the evolution of nervous systems, particularly in modern worms and arthropods who are both related to this animal. 

space science image The Hubble Took an Image of a 'Blue Bubble' That Is Actually a Nebula
Via: @NASA
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The Hubble Space Telescope took this image of a star that looks like it's inside a blue bubble. NASA says the blue bubble is actually a nebula formed around 20,000 years ago. This is how it's described on the Hubble's website:

The distinctive blue bubble appearing to encircle WR 31a is a Wolf–Rayet nebula — an interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other gases. Created when speedy stellar winds interact with the outer layers of hydrogen ejected by Wolf–Rayet stars, these nebulae are frequently ring-shaped or spherical.


According to NASA, these type of stars don't last very long (in terms of bodies in space at least). It'll only be around for a "few hundred thousand years".


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Get your conspiracy theories ready. This spooky TV documentary about the lost files from the Apollo 10 space mission suggests that there might be something out there on the dark side of the Moon. 



While orbiting the Moon in 1969, these 'previously lost' recordings show that the astronauts on Apollo 10 heard some kind of strange music.  Of course, the prevailing (reasonable) theory suggests radio interference.  In 1969, it might have seemed strange and unexplained but after decades of space exploration, NASA has actually recorded similar sounds in different parts of the Solar System. 




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When the soft drink 7-Up first came out it was 'lithiated'. The soda used to include lithium citrate, which is now better known as a mood-stabilizing drug. Similar to how Coca-Cola famously used to contain cocaine, the makers of 7-Up were capitalizing on the popularity of "medicated" soft drinks at the time.

That's what inspired this experiment. The original 7-Up did not contain a chunk of metal lithium but the end result is entertaining. The solution even ends up working as an indicator, changing from colorful to clear and back again depending on the acidity of the solution.

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Japanese artist Nobumichi Asai created this effect by projecting images onto faces in real time. The features of the user's faces are mapped and tracked and then the 'new face' is projected onto that in a 3D pattern that gives them such a realistic look. 

This kind of 3D projection has also been used to make videos like this one: 

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