science

Via: hashi856
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

What is this black magic?!

Here's a good video explaining what's actually going on here.

Probably a good idea not to try this at home, unless you have a T-1000 terminator chasing you.

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Impressed that we landed on a comet and sent a ship into deep space?

Well that's nothing compared to this toilet rocket.

Members of the Michiana Rocketry club successfully shot a porta-potty into the sky this past weekend in the name of science at a soybean field in Michigan.

About 30 people were involved in the "Thrusting the Throne" launch, which was planned over the past 2 years.

The group conducted numerous test runs with scaled down models before the actual launch with mixed success.

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

A new short film by Swedish artist Erik Wernquist uses audio from Carl Sagan's 1994 book "Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space" and original animations to visualize what life might be like after Earth.

Wernquist based all of his images on real scientific ideas and concepts from NASA, which you can read more about on his site.

According to the description:

The title WANDERERS refer partly to the original meaning of the word "planet". In ancient greek, the planets visible in the sky were collectively called "aster planetes" which means "wandering star". It also refers to ourselves; for hundreds of thousands of years - the wanderers of the Earth. In time I hope we take that leap off the ground and permanently become wanderers of the sky. Wanderers among the wanderers.
3D printer,science,space
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

We aren't quite at Star Trek replicator levels of awesomeness yet, but we're getting there.

This week astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) printed the first 3D object in space.

A private company called Made In Space designed and built the printer for NASA through their Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

The printed piece is actually a part for the printer itself - a faceplate for the extruder.

So what is the significance of all this?

"This 'First Print' serves to demonstrate the potential of the technology to produce replacement parts on demand if a critical component fails in space," said Jason Dunn, Chief Technical Officer for Made In Space.

And maybe to make a fork and knife to eat all that meat the British keep sending up there.

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Corning, the company that makes the glass used on many smartphones, has hired the Mythbusters as pitchmen to explain the technology behind their product and of course, try to smash it.

In the videos, they dub this era "The Glass Age," and go into a bit about the history of the material.

They also discuss a new thinner and more flexible glass product called Willow Glass, which is expected to be incorporated into products for consumers in 2016.

You can watch Part 2 below:

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

We can land a spacecraft on a comet, but a man's shirt has become the big news story here on Earth.

Physicist Matt Taylor was criticized this week for wearing a shirt with semi-naked women and guns on it during a livestreamed post-landing interview about the Rosetta Mission, deemed sexist and innaporpriate by many people, particularly women in science. And critics on Twitter voiced their complaints with #ShirtStorm and #ShirtGate.

But in a Google Hangout Friday with updates on the mission, a teary-eyed Taylor in a very neutral blue hoodie, apologized for the shirt.

"I made a big mistake, and I offended many people," he said. "And I'm very sorry about this."

Meanwhile on said comet, the Philae lander sent back its first image from the comet Thursday, and it has begun drilling in order to reposition itself into the sunlight. But this maneuver could also make Philae do a cartwheel and possibly put an abrupt end to the mission.

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

History was made Wednesday when the European Space Agency successfully landed a spacecraft on a comet for the first time ever.

"We are the first to do this - and that [achievement] will stay forever." said Jean Jacques Dordain, Director General of ESA.



The comet, 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, orbits, the sun every 6.45 years. It is 2.1 miles wide by 2.4 miles long.

Rosetta first launched in 2004 to research the comet, and it didn't arrived at its destination until this past August. On Wednesday morning, Philae first separated from the probe to attempt a landing.

Researchers are hoping to learn more about the origins of the solar system and whether or not comets could have brought water and life to Earth. Watch an ESA animated explanation of Rosetta's journey to the comet and it's surface mission below.


The comet has also been emitting a strange "song" into space, which has surprised scientists.
"The scientists think it must be produced in some way by the activity of the comet, as it releases neutral particles into space where they become electrically charged due to a process called ionisation. But the precise physical mechanism behind the oscillations remains a mystery."
But it's obviously aliens trying to communicate with us, right? Hopefully the message isn't "Warning: Do not land on this comet."

Back to Top