science

unicorn science fossils Unicorns Were Real, and They Lived in Kazakhstan
Via USNews
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Fossils of a prehistoric creature called the Siberian Unicorn, or Elasmotherium sibiricum, have been found in the Pavlodar region of Kazakhstan.  Most depictions of this animal show it looking kind of like a cross between a rhinoceros and a donkey rather than a noble horse. 


via Heinrich Harder via copyrightexpired

Though the Siberian Unicorn is decidedly less majestic than you might expect, this find is still pretty big news. Scientists thought that the species died out at least 350,000 years ago but that's not the case.  These new fossils place it at around 29,000 years ago according to a study published in the American Journal of Applied Sciences.

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The idea for a spoon you can eat originated in Hyderabad, India with the inventor, Narayana Peesapaty.  It's a pretty sturdy spoon with just a few ingredients that he hopes will be able to compete with disposable plastic spoons.  

Originally only available in India, it looks like this spoon might be coming to American markets. 


via @NarayanaPeesapa

If you're wondering how it can stand up to hot liquids and still biodegrade a few days later the answer is that the water does have some affect on it.  A dry spoon in an airtight container will stay good for up to two years but, according to the FAQ on the Bakey's website, if you leave it in liquid for over 10 minutes it will get soggy.

Via Vox
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You've probably learned about vestigial organs in Biology class by now. There are a lot of things that aren't important to humans any more but we've still held onto them in some way. If you've ever seen someone wiggle their ears, it's obvious. 

This video shows some of those unnecessary parts and why we used to have them. It also goes into detail about the way that some humans have actually lost those extra pieces. 



That's evolution at work. 

science biology neil degrasse tyson Neil DeGrasse Tyson Reminds Everyone He Is Not a Biologist With One Very Inaccurate Tweet
Via neiltyson
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Neil DeGrasse Tyson made a lot of people (and presumably ducks, cats and bedbugs) angry with a much less than true fact about sex and evolution.  His claim, that sex doesn't hurt any species had many Twitter users jumping to correct him. 


via @RachelFeltman, @SciPhile, @ClaireConnelly, @carlzimmer@DreadMorgan

And you might be thinking, he's just trying to be positive about human sexuality and say, in his own pseudoscientific way that it's healthy and painless for humans. But... that's actually not true either:


via @DebbyHerbenick@mikamckinnon

Sure, he's a scientist but cut him some slack, he's not that kind of scientist. He studied astrophysics, how's he supposed to check his facts at all before Tweeting about biology?


via my-little-talks

space science mars NASA Successfully Tested the Rocket Engine That Might Take Humans to Mars
Via NASA
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According to NASA's article on the test, this is a big step toward sending a manned mission to Mars:

NASA successfully tested the first deep space RS-25 rocket engine for 500 seconds March 10, clearing a major milestone toward the next great era of space exploration. The next time rocket engine No. 2059 fires for that length of time, it will be carrying humans on their first deep-space mission in more than 45 years.

This is all part of a plan to send humans to Mars by 2030, which NASA has laid out in this beautifully illustrated image:

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NASA released images of the recent solar eclipse. When seen from the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) it's just the shadow of the moon traveling across Earth. 

This is a first, according to Adam Szabo, NASA’s project scientist for DSCOVR: 

What is unique for us is that being near the Sun-Earth line, we follow the complete passage of the lunar shadow from one edge of the Earth to the other. A geosynchronous satellite would have to be lucky to have the middle of an eclipse at noon local time for it. I am not aware of anybody ever capturing the full eclipse in one set of images or video.



via earthobservatory

spiders fish science Oh Good, Scientists Have Discovered a Spider That Can Swim and Fish
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The newly discovered spider called the dolomedes briangreenei hails from, you guessed it, Australia.  One of it's species, whose name is Brian, was presented at the World Science Festival in Brisbane. 

He was named after Professor Brian Greene, cofounder of the World Science Festival and a string theorist. 



Brian (the spider, not the string theorist) uses vibrations in the water to fish. Robert Raven, Principal Scientist of Arachnology at the Queensland Museum told Mashable:

These spiders sit there on the water and then all of a sudden an insect will hit the water and the spider races out to get it, grabs it, dives under the water and then swims back to the shore and starts eating it. 


It eats insects, fish and toads up to three times it's own size. Apparently its bites aren't that dangerous but the fact remains; now even the water is not safe from spiders.