space

Amazing how much lightning can strike our planet in a short timeFlying from North Africa over Turkey towards Russia in this timelapse (this is speeded up; travelling about 5500 km would take around 10-12 minutes, covered here in 30 seconds).

Posted by Tim Peake on Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Astronaut Tim Peake posted a time lapse video from the International Space Station (ISS) that caught a particularly striking view of lightening as it flew over Earth. According to the caption, all these lightening strikes happened in a matter of minutes:

Flying from North Africa over Turkey towards Russia in this timelapse (this is speeded up; travelling about 5500 km would take around 10-12 minutes, covered here in 30 seconds).


As the ISS orbits the Earth astronauts living in the space station have the chance to take amazing time lapse video like this and others.

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What are these glorious golden space swirls? According to NASA, who captured this video with the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), this happened when a dark solar filament erupted and caused a chain reaction.They call these cascading magnetic arches because what you see here is a lot of particles spinning around the sun's magnetic field lines. 

Here's a video where you can see what a dark solar filament looks like. The darker area, almost in the shape of a circle is it. Filaments are plasma held above the sun's surface by magnetic forces. 




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Neil deGrasse Tyson took to Twitter recently to toy with some earthlings, challenge, nitpick, and critique a series of scientific inaccuracies in 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens.'


He's done this in the past with other movies like 'Interstellar,' and quite frankly, it's a bit of an unbecoming buzzkill. Tyson doesn't care though, and claims some of the audience will watch sci-fi films for ideas on what to invent for future days.

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The Hubble website managed to explain what's happening in this picture while relating it all to Star Wars. 

In the center of the image, partially obscured by a dark, Jedi-like cloak of dust, a newborn star shoots twin jets out into space as a sort of birth announcement to the universe. Gas from a surrounding disk rains down onto the dust-obscured protostar and engorges it. The material is superheated and shoots outward from the star in opposite directions along an uncluttered escape route — the star's rotation axis.

Much more energetic than a science fiction lightsaber, these narrow energetic beams are blasting across space at over 100,000 miles per hour. This celestial lightsaber does not lie in a galaxy far, far away but rather inside our home galaxy, the Milky Way.



Apparently this process is all part of forming a new star. The Hubble website also includes a concept art that shows a clearer example of the beams of energy shooting out from the pancake of clouds and dust. 

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Neil deGrasse Tyson is like everyone's second dad who happens to know a lot about science.

But he's still just as embarrassing.

In a video from National Geographic, the scientist explains what it would take to have sex in space. And things get super S&M real fast.

"If you want to sort of get together [and] stay together, you need something to, like, keep you together during all the normal body movements that would characterize having sex in space," Tyson says.

"So yeah, just bring a lot of leather belts to keep things strapped down and you'll be just fine."

Neil gets even more awkward at the end of the video.

Just stop, Science Dad. Just stop.

Via: StilesSays
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Bill! Bill! Bill! Bill!

Bill Nye appeared on Whose Line is is Anyway and showed that this Science Guy has some serious comedy chops.

With fan favorites, Ryan Stiles and Colin Mochrie, the trio played a game where Stiles' hands were provided by Mochrie. And they were all in space because duh—science.

Things got hilarious very quickly, with Bill Nye having to taste some of the "space food."

Ryan ended the skit on this final gross note.

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Via: The Verge
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It took nine years and 3 billion miles, but at 7:49 a.m. EST the New Horizons spacecraft passed what was once the furthest planet in our solar system.

Traveling at a speed of 30,800 miles per hour, New Horizons zoomed by Pluto a scant 7,800 miles away. This is the closest we have ever got to Pluto and it will send back some of the best images of the maligned dwarf planet we have ever seen. Maybe this will convince those scientists to let it back into the club and give us the nine planets that we deserve.

But we've learned a lot so far. For instance, now we know how big the dang thing is.

This morning, NASA announced that Pluto is 2,370km (about 1,473 miles) in diameter, give or take 20m. That makes it ever so slightly bigger than Eris, a much darker and denser object that lives farther out in the Kuiper Belt. (Eris measures 2,336km in diameter.) Measurements of Pluto's size before today were estimates at best, their accuracy skewed by the dwarf planet's hazy atmosphere.



We've also learned that Pluto has a pretty big ice cap, filled with lots of nitrogen and frozen methane. (I could've told you the place was cold nine years ago.)

Since this mission happened billions of miles away and it takes four hours for the radio waves New Horizon sends us to be uploaded, we shouldn't expect to see any pictures filled with happy, waving aliens until tonight.

Also, by the way, the download speed on that information is 1 Kb/s. Dialup hell.



Here's a video explaining the delicacy and scale of this Pluto flyby:



As we got closer to the dwarf planet, however, all anyone could see was the image of Mickey Mouse's dog, carefully hidden within the terrain.

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