Space Shot of the Day: The Horsehead Nebula

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Space Shot of the Day: The Horsehead Nebula
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The Horsehead Nebula, located approximately 1,300 to 1,500 lightyears from Earth in the constellation of Orion, is making buzz in the space news circuit after researchers at the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy detected an unusually dense presence of hydrocarbon molecule C3H+—one of the smallest molecules that compose petroleum and natural gas—estimated to be 200 times more than the total amount of water on Earth.

Space Shot of the Day: The Carina Nebula

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Space Shot of the Day: The Carina Nebula
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Taken by the British Herschel Space Observatory with its far infrared telescope, the Carina Nebula is home to some of the most massive and brightest stars in the Milky Way galaxy that is 7500 light-years from Earth and estimated to be equivalent in mass to 900,000 suns.

Space Shot of the Day: Cathedral to Massive Stars

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Space Shot of the Day: Cathedral to Massive Stars
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The Hubble Space Telescope took this spellbinding image of Pismis 24 (shown center above), one of the most massive and luminous star clusters known, glimmering above the NGC 6357 nebula that is approximately 8150 light-years away. According to NASA's estimates, the brightest star of Pismis 24 cluster is over 200 times the mass of our Sun.



Space Shot of the Day is a feature series following the latest developments in planetary science, astrophotography, space exploration, future plans for colonization and all things related to outer space.

Space Shot of the Day: Unusual Auroras Over Saturn's North Pole

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Space Shot of the Day: Unusual Auroras Over Saturn's North Pole
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Here's an infrared image of Saturn's north pole surrounded by auroral rings in full circle, unlike the ones that are far more tamed by magnetic fields that we're used to seeing. According to NASA, the large size and variable patterns of these auroras indicate that "charged particles streaming in from the Sun are experiencing some type of magnetism above Saturn that was previously unexpected." The image was captured in 2008 by Cassini spacecraft, which arrived in Saturn's orbit in 2004 and still remains active to this day.



Space Shot of the Day is a feature series following the latest developments in planetary science, astrophotography, space exploration, future plans for colonization and all things related to outer space.

Space Shot of the Day: Leonids Meteor Shower

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Space Shot of the Day: Leonids Meteor Shower
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The earth's sky is open for a double feature this week, first with the rare sighting of a total solar eclipse in Australia on Wednesday, and now one of the most spectacular meteor showers returns for its annual November show. Commonly known as Leonids, reports of the celestial storm have been recorded as early as the 10th century and its most prolific shower in 1833 saw as many as 100,000 meteors per hour. The photograph (shown left) was taken by Fred Aspenak in November 2001.

For a better view, check out the telescopic recording of the shower provided by NASA's Marshall Center.



Space Shot of the Day is a feature series following the latest developments in planetary science, astrophotography, space exploration, future plans for colonization and all things related to outer space.

Crowdsourcing Project of the Day

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The U.S. military's renowned R&D wing Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is the latest bureau to join the crowdsourcing bandwagon with the launch of SpaceView, a sky-monitoring project that enables amateur space-gazers to gather data for the U.S. Air Force's Space Surveillance Network and help protect American orbital assets from colliding with space junk. NASA estimates there are more than 500,000 pieces of dangerous space debris orbiting the Earth, including spent rocket stages, defunct satellites and parts from other spacecraft.



Crowdsourcing Project of the Day is a feature series documenting the latest tools and innovations that are powered by the crowdsourcing model.

Space Shot of the Day: 100,000 Stars

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Space Shot of the Day: 100,000 Stars
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If you're running on Chrome browser, check out Google's latest Experiment project that visualizes the precise location of at least 100,000 stars in our Milky Way galaxy, using various imagery and data pulled from NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). For your frame of reference, there are approximately 200 to 400 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy.



Space Shot of the Day is a feature series following the latest developments in planetary science, astrophotography, space exploration, future plans for colonization and all things related to outer space.