blind

Via Jenkem
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Lots of us played Tony Hawk: Pro Skater and expected to leave the house doing kickflip to tailslide to bluntslide to that Chad Muska beats-slide where he pulls out a boombox. But very few of us could.

Still there are skateboarders who can trump the impossible things we’ve seen in video games. One of them is Dan Mancina, a skateboarder who is legally blind.

Mancina, who’s vision started to fade at 13, only has a slight amount of peripheral vision and a cane, but he’s still able to pull off some things most could only dream of — namely skating with a smooth controlled style. That’s the real money.

But according to Spolid, that’s not all that Mancina can do. In the video compilation “Dan Mancina Does Stuff Blind,” he chops wood, throws a bullseye, and fires a machine gun. Let this be an inspiration to all of us.




via Jenkem

Check out a full interview with Mancia over at Jenkem.

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Jewel Shuping purposefully blinded herself with drain cleaner because she had yearned to be blind since she was six years old.

She suffers from Body Integrity Identity Disorder or BIID, which is usually associated with believing that one's limbs doesn't belong to one's self and manifests in a desire to lose that limb.

"I really feel this is the way I was supposed to be born, that I should have been blind from birth," the 30-year-old Shuping said.

Shuping's case is made even stranger by the fact that she worked with a psychiatrist to blind herself, presumably under the assumption that it was a treatment.

Even though she doesn't regret her decision, in fact now saying that she's never been happier, Shuping is trying to create awareness of BIID so that people don't take the route she did.



"Don't go blind the way I did. I know there is a need, but perhaps someday there will be treatment for it," Shuping said. "People with BIID get trains to run over their legs, freeze dry their legs or fall off cliffs to try to paralyze themselves.

"It's very dangerous. And they need professional help."



Bully who punched a blind kid gets some justice of his own from the hero that stepped in to stop him.
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We talked about this stand up teen who knocked down a bully picking on a blind kid yesterday and it looks like further justice has been served.

The authorities and social media have gotten involved.

New York Daily News put together a comprehensive story about the fight:

A California high school bully who was thrown to the ground after beating up a partially blind student was arrested Thursday, police said as the teen who stopped the assault spoke out for the first time.

The teen tormenter, Noah, was arrested for misdemeanor battery and released to his parents after a video of him hitting his visually impaired peer, Austin, at Huntington Beach High School circulated on social media, police said.

[Cody Pines, the teen who stopped the bully] was hailed a hero online and by his peers for his actions, although Pines said he "didn't really want to hit him" in his first interview Thursday.

"But when you punch a blind kid, that's what made me so mad," Pines told FOX LA. "I kinda regretted it but I kinda didn't because if I didn't Austin would've been more hurt."

Here's the video if you haven't seen it yet:

Pines, a former football player, said he had seen other videos of bullies "beating up kids and getting away with it" and told himself he would never let that happen if he witnessed it.

Teresa White said she is "proud of our grandson for standing up for that young man."

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Many of us remember the dangerously delicious Mr. Sketch markers that had a pleasant aroma associated with each color that left us coloring our nostrils more than our paper. Tommy Edison, a blind YouTuber has declided to do his best in guessing the color of each based on smell only. Being born blind his understanding of colors is only based on what he's been told, so the results are rather impressive.

By Unknown
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YouTuber Tommy Edison sheds a light on the communication gap between the sighted and the blind when it comes to describing and perceiving colors.