endangered species

  • -
  • Vote
  • -


He is over 100 years old, weighs about 175 pounds, is nearly 35 inches long, five feet tall, and the ladies love him. His name is Diego. Diego the Chelonoidis hoodensis Galapagos giant tortoise.



According to Washington Tapia, a tortoise preservation specialist at Galapagos National Park, Diego "has fathered an estimated 800 offspring, almost single-handedly rebuilding the species' population--and saving it from extinction--on their native island, Espanola, the southernmost in the Galapagos Archipelago."

"Around 50 years ago, there were only two males and 12 females of Diego's species alive on Espanola, and they were too spread out to reproduce."

Six years ago, they did a genetic study and discovered that Diego was the father of nearly 40 percent of the offspring released into the wild on Espanola, thereby doing more parenting than any other turtle to repopulate the species.





"He's a very sexually active male reproducer. He's contributed enormously to repopulating the island," said Tapia.




"Rawr, damn straight," replied Diego.



By Unknown
  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Fewer than 100 pairs of Spoon-billed Sandpipers are thought to remain in the wild, but the critically endangered species got a major boost last week when a flock of 14 hatched in captivity in the U.K.

Just several days old, the chicks are all legs and awkwardness. But RSPB wildlife charity director Dr. Tim Stowe is confident the flock will help the species make a comeback:

A bird like the Spoon-billed Sandpiper, with its bizarre little beak, has survived through time and it doesn't deserve to be wiped out now.

[zooborns]