g rated

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This GoPro camera has boldly gone where no GoPro camera has gone before.

Well, they have been nearly everywhere at this point, but this one is definitely hard to beat.

Over the summer, astronauts from NASA and the European Space Agency inserted a sealed GoPro camera into a water bubble to investigate water surface tension in microgravity on the International Space Station.

They also shot the video with a 3D camera, so if you have red-blue stereoscopic 3D vision glasses, you can watch that version here.

internet archive arcade video games g rated Video Game Coverage - 8368986368
Via PC World
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Well, there goes the workday.

The Internet Archive, a non-profit working to build a library of the Internet, has added over 900 originally coin-operated arcade games to its site this week, all playable in your browser without any additional downloads.

"A lot of people are going to migrate to games they recognize and ones that they may not have played in years. They'll do a few rounds, probably get their asses kicked, smile, and go back to their news sites," writes Jason Scott the man who put this all together, effectively destroying workplace productivity across the country.

Last year the Internet Archive added a "Console Living Room" section, that included games from Atari and Sega.

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For the fourth year in a row, Jimmy Kimmel has encouraged parents to make their kids cry, film it, and publish it online for all to see.

The method for making them upset: pretending to eat all of their Halloween candy.

Here's a collection of some of the best submissions, according to Kimmel. And as terrible as it all might sound, the result is hilarious.

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Gustavo Angel Tamayo has never played basketball in his life, but after getting selected to compete in a timed shot contest for his school he stepped up his game.

explorers antarctica discovery awesome science g rated School of FAIL - 8362010112
Via Discovery
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These are the photographs and journal of George Murray Levick, who traveled with Captain Robert Falcon Scott (greatest name ever) on the ill-fated south pole expedition.



Via Discovery:

Levick was one of six men in Scott's Northern Party, who summered (1911-1912) at Cape Adare and survived the winter of 1912 in a snow cave when their ship was unable to reach them. Levick was not part of the team that accompanied Scott on his doomed quest to be the first to reach the South Pole.

After an arduous two-and-a-half month trek, Scott and his crew did make it to the South Pole on Jan. 17, 1912. But they discovered that the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen had beat them to it. Scott and his team died on the way back to their base, faced with a blizzard and dwindling supplies.