pollution

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Tiny Octopus Finds a New Home With Help From a Friendly Diver

Divers had planned to spend their time under the water collecting shells. But when they happened upon a small coconut octopus using a disposable plastic cup as a shelter, they knew they had to act. This species has a predisposition from birth to seek shelter, which is often a coconut or seashell. Though the shell it found is good protection, the cup is dangerous, both for the octopus, and any predator that might try to eat it, and would most likely ingest the plastic as well.

The issue with finding a "new home" for the octopus, is that coconut octopi are extremely picky about the shells they choose for themselves, so the octopus in the video rejected a number of shells that it was offered, before finding one to its liking. 

This is a relatively harmless case, but human waste kills sea creatures by the millions every year. Next time you go to the beach, be a little less lazy. Grab some reusable cups. Try to make sure there are less creatures like these using our waste thinking it is a part of their environment.

Tiny octopus found by divers living in a shell and a plastic cup and they try to find him a replacement shell to give up the
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trending eco friendly news new recycled fashion from ocean water bottles
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Bionic Yarn.

No, not from Spiderman, but yarn and fabrics made up of single-use plastic bottles--many found floating in the ocean--sewed into hip clothes. That's the idea behind the company Bionic Yarn, co-founded by Tyson Toussant, partnered with ocean protector Paul Watson, and with recording artist Pharrell Williams as their Creative Director.



They make denim jeans, snowboarding jackets, boat covers, furniture, and other products using their innovating product.

Their concept is to clean the oceans and promote using reusable products. For instance, they promote facts about plastic bottle usage:







Apparently, since "plastic bottles are made up of the same polymer as polyester," Bionic Yarn can bypass the use of crude oil-based yarn products through their own recycling process.




They refine the bottles into chips and then heat and pull-apart the fibers and spin them into yarn. They can then mix the yarn with cotten or wool for whatever item they want to sew.




These aren't your Mama's recycled pants.



Check out their products here.


A hermit crap uses a toothpaste cap for its shell, depressing everyone.
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Sad, dying world, at least you keep the crabs smelling minty fresh.

The above picture of a Cuban crab trying his best originally showed up on Reddit, but it's turned into a broader symbol of just how much GD pollution we are putting in the GD ocean.


The Daily Mail took the picture and put it into depressing, depressing perspective:

According to recent estimates, the ocean is filled with eight million tonnes of garbage - enough to fill five carrier bags for every foot of coastline on the planet.

...Around 8 million tons of plastic bottles, bags, toys and other plastic rubbish ends up in the world's oceans each year. Because of the difficulties in working out the exact amount, since much of it may have sunk, scientists say the true figure could be as much as 12.7 million tons polluting the ocean each year.

Carried by sea currents, this waste congregates into five giant 'garbage islands' that swirl around the world's major ocean gyres.



And even worse, there are other examples, as found by the Daily Dot.





You can read more about it if you want, we need to take a nap.

high def China smog LED humanity pollution beijing - 8009082112
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According to Time World, China's capital city has reached a level of pollution where the only way to spot the sunrise is on a super-sized flatscreen. For those who would like to have an early-morning moment of inspiration, citizens of Beijing can gaze upon the city's LED screens to view the astronomical start to a new day.

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At the bottom of Indonesia's Lembeh Strait, one whitespotted hermit crab tries on a new shell (and then goes back to its old one), while another finds a slightly less conventional home: part of a discarded soda bottle.

With actual shells for hermit crabs in short supply these days, some of them have been forced to adapt new uses for rubbish that makes its way to the ocean floor.

The particular decapod wasn't wearing his improvised shell for long, though. The divers who took the video reported that two nights later, "we found the bottle abandoned and the hermit walking briskly about carrying a tried-and-true triton shell."

[videosift]