robots

Via TheDmel
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KMel Robotics presents a team of flying robot quadcopters that have taken up new instruments to play some fresh songs.

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Artist Jordan Wolfson collaborated with a visual effects studio to make this weird, undulating robot for the David Zwirner contemporary art gallery in New York City. When reached for comment, the sculpture simply responded:

By Unknown
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We should have one robot face another robot for an endless game!

By Unknown
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Timo Boll, German table tennis star, is the new brand ambassador for KUKA Robotics in China. The collaboration celebrates the inherent speed, precision, and flexibility of KUKA's industrial robots in tandem with Boll's electrifying and tactical prowess in competition.

To celebrate the new KUKA Robotics factory in Shanghai, the two giants will battle to the end on March 11th 2014.
fish robotic fake pets robots - 6660338176
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You'll still have to change its batteries eventually. Can you handle that?

By Unknown
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A pair of scientists in New Zealand are predicting that the brothels of the future will be staffed by robot prostitutes. In a research paper on the sex industry, "Robots, Men And Sex Tourism," Ian Yeoman and Michelle Mars believe that by 2050, clients will pay nearly $10,000 for an all-inclusive evening that features everything from lap dances to intercourse from "a range of sexual gods and goddesses of different ethnicity, body shapes, ages, languages, and sexual features."

If the reality i

Via Mr. King
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Atlas is a new robot from Boston Dynamics.  With a complete inability to feel empathy and an impressive sense of balance, this robot is capable of almost anything. The original video is meant to show off his new abilities and the description has all the specs:

A new version of Atlas, designed to operate outdoors and inside buildings. It is specialized for mobile manipulation. It is electrically powered and hydraulically actuated. It uses sensors in its body and legs to balance and LIDAR and stereo sensors in its head to avoid obstacles, assess the terrain, help with navigation and manipulate objects. This version of Atlas is about 5' 9" tall (about a head shorter than the DRC Atlas) and weighs 180 lbs.
via Boston Dynamics


You can't help feeling bad for the poor robot, especially when that scientist just pushed him down face first.