soda

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Shame: is there a better sales tool?

If you’re not sure people will buy your cellphone, car, or piece of fruit, why not convince them that they’re bad if they don’t? Make them feel embarrassed or stupid. It just works. Shame sells.

That’s what Sodastream, the makers of a sparkling water machine, is doing, and they’re using your favorite show, Game of Thrones, to shame you.

Recreating Cersei Lannister’s walk of shame through King’s Landing, Sodastream enlists the help of Game of Thrones’ Thor Bjornsson (the Mountain) and Hannah Waddingham, who steps back into the role of Septa Unella, bell and all and shames a consumer for buying bottled seltzer at the store, like a real jerk.

via Mess Bog

Here’s a rundown of this perfectly normal, not crazy at all advertisement:

Like in Game of Thrones, Septa parades a person through the streets shouting “Shame” and ringing her bell. Only instead of shaming this consumer for political espionage and crimes against god, he’s shamed for buying bottled seltzer and crimes against “Mother Earth.” Septa chases the consumer back to the GoT set, where he meets the Mountain, who Mountain-splains the effects of plastic bottles on and the bounties of the environment, like peanuts! Then, back in his trailer, the Mountain sees the actress Hannah Waddingham taking off her Septa costume and is taken by her beauty. All in all, great commercial for a seltzermaker thingy.

via Dussenberg

Anyway, we should all be very ashamed of ourselves for even considering buying bottled seltzer over a Sodastream because peanuts. 

Based on their YouTube page, it looks like this is just the beingging of a whole sorted love affair between Septa and the Mountain, so get ready to feel weird for a while. 

via Shame or Glory

Enjoy this insane commercial!

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When the soft drink 7-Up first came out it was 'lithiated'. The soda used to include lithium citrate, which is now better known as a mood-stabilizing drug. Similar to how Coca-Cola famously used to contain cocaine, the makers of 7-Up were capitalizing on the popularity of "medicated" soft drinks at the time.

That's what inspired this experiment. The original 7-Up did not contain a chunk of metal lithium but the end result is entertaining. The solution even ends up working as an indicator, changing from colorful to clear and back again depending on the acidity of the solution.

Comeback of the Day: Surge Soda Returns To Shelves
Via ABC 15
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Attention all 90's kids—time is a flat circle.

Surge, the popular soda that has been discontinued since 2003, is now back on store shelves in the United States. Although the beverage has been available online since 2014, today marks the first day customers can hop on down to their local supermarket and pick up the sugary drink.

The company announced the return on Twitter back in August in a larger than life way.

The big news should be taken with a grain of salt if you don't live in the Midwest, East Coast or the South. Go to the Surge website to see if the drink is in your area.

If you can't get Surge in your area, just watch this ridiculous, stereotypical 90's commercial for the soda. And be jealous. Be very, very jealous.

surge soda nostalgia coca cola - 8319190016
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After 12 years the world's biggest beverage company will begin selling 12-packs of the citrus drink on Amazon Monday, and it is the first time Coca-Cola has sold a product exclusively online. The company says the move is a response to a surge of nostalgia for the soda.

Surge, launched in 1996 very aggressively as an answer to Mountain Dew. Initially, reception to the beverage was strong, its appeal faded by the early 2000s.

You can buy the beverage on Amazon here.